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Full text of "Annual report"

THE TOWN OF 
IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 

2008 ANNUAL REPORT 





2008-2009 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Standing left to right (back) - Patrick J. McNally, James W. Foley, and Charles D. Surpitski 
Standing left to right (front) - Ingrid F. Miles-Chair, Elizabeth A. Kilcoyne 



Cover Photo: Dow Brook Conservation Area Boardwalk 

Photographer: Tess O'Connor 

Annual Town Report Compiled by Sarah Stanton 



ANNUAL TOWN REPORT 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

2008 




TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Roster of Town Officials and Committees 6 

May 13, 2008 Annual Town Meeting 17 

October 20, 2008 Special Town Meeting 27 

Board of Selectmen 52 

Finance Committee 55 

Town Manager 56 

Special Asst. Town Manager, Purchasing 57 

Department of Public Safety 57 

Police Department 57 

Fire Department 59 

Animal Control 60 

Harbors 61 

Shellfish 62 

Department of Public Works 63 

Public Works Divisions 63 

Facilities Department 64 

Cemeteries/Parks Department 67 

Department of Code Enforcement 68 

Building Department 68 

Health Department 69 

Zoning Board of Appeals 71 

Department of Planning and Development 72 

Planning Board 73 

Conservation Commission 75 

Historical Commission 77 

Housing Partnership 78 

Open Space Committee 80 

Agricultural Commission 80 

Department of Human Services 81 

Recreation Department 83 

Youth Services 83 

Council on Aging 84 

Veterans Services 85 

Department of Utilities 86 

Electric Department 86 

Water Division 87 

Wastewater Treatment 88 



TABLE OF CONTENTS (CONTINUED) 

Finance Directorate 90 

Accounting Office 90 

Treasurer/Collector 90 

Assessors Office 91 

Town Clerk 91 

Elections and Registrations 92 

MIS Department 94 

Ipswich Public Library 95 

School Department 98 

Hall-Haskell House 107 

Ipswich Bay Circuit Trail Committee 107 

Government Study Committee 108 

Recycling Committee 109 

Trust Fund Commission 109 

Cable TV Advisory Committee 11 1 

Financial Statements-Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2008 112 



2008 ROSTER OF TOWN OFFICIALS AND COMMITTEES 



Elected 



Member 



Moderator 
(1 year) 

Board of Selectmen 
(3 years) 



A. James Grimes III 



Ingrid F. Miles, Chair 

James W. Foley 

Elizabeth A. Kilcoyne 

Patrick J. McNally 

Edward B. Rauscher 



School Committee 
(3 years) 



Joan K. Arsenault, Chair 

Barry Hopping 

Edmund Traverso 

Hugh O'Flynn 

Dianne Ross 

Jeffrey B. Loeb 

Norman Sheppard 



Appointed 

Finance Committee 
(3 years) 



Robert White, Chair 

Janice Clements-Skelton 

Jamie Fay 

William M. Craft 

Michael Schaaf 

Marion Swan 

Raymond K. Morley 

Richard F. Howard 

Larry E. Seidler 

Lynne Gibbs, Administrative Asst. 



Whittier Regional Technical Vocational 
High School Representative 



Raymond K. Morley 



Town Officials 



Town Manager 
Special Assistant to the Town Manager 



Robert T. Markel 

Sarah A. Stanton 



Superintendent of Schools 



Richard L. Korb 



Director of Finance 
MIS Director 

Assessor 

Town Clerk 

Assistant Town Clerk 

Treasurer/C ol lector 

Assistant Treasurer 

Deputy Tax Collector 



Rita M. Negri 

Gregory Parachojuk 

Frank J. Ragonese 

Pamela Z. Carakatsane 

Kathleen A. Marini 

Kevin A. Merz 

Donald J. Carter 

Kelley & Ryan Associates, Inc. 



Director of Code Enforcement 

Local Building Inspector 

Health Agent 

Food Inspector 

Plumbing & Gas Inspector 

Alternate Plumbing & Gas Inspector 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Fence Viewer 

Wiring Inspector 

Asst. Wiring Inspector 



James A. Sperber 

Eric Colville 
Colleen Fermon 

Allen R. Gromko 
Robert R. Hyde 
Kevin Lombard 
Dwight Brothers 

James A. Sperber 

Donald R. Stone 

David Levesque, Sr. 



Director of Plant & Facilities 
Assistant to Facilities Director 



William A. Hodge 
Jane Spellman 



Director of Public Works 

Operations Manager 
Supt/Cemetery & Parks 



Robert Gravino 

Richard Clarke 

James E. Graffum 



Fire Chief 
Fire Prevention Officer 



Arthur Howe 
Willard Maker 



Police Chief 
Police Lieutenant 



Gavin Keenan 
Daniel Moriarity 



Harbormaster 
Assistant Harbormaster 



Gavin Keenan 
Thomas Colpitts 



Shellfish Constable 
Asst Shellfish Constable 
Asst Shellfish Constable 



Arnold Thistlewood 
Scott LaPreste 
Jeremy Smith 



Emergency Management Director 
Assistant Emergency Mgt Director 

Animal Control Officer 
Assistant Animal Control Officer 



Arthur Howe 
Daniel Moriarty 

Matthew Antczak 
Girard Martin 



Director of Human Services 

Director of Council on Aging 

Town Historian 



Elizabeth M. Dorman 

Diane Mitchell 

Patricia Tyler 



Library Director 
Assistant Library Director 



Victor E. Dyer 
Genevieve Picard 



Director of Planning & Development 

Assistant Planner 

Affordable Housing Coordinator 

Open Space Program Manager 

Stewardship Coordinator 

Conservation Agent 



Glenn C. Gibbs 

Kathleen Connor 

Thomas L. Bentley 

Kristen Grubbs 

Beth O'Connor 

David P. Pancoast 



Town Counsel 



Attorney George Hall Jr. 
Anderson and Krieger 



Director of Utilities 

Wastewater Treatment Plant Supt. 

Business Manager/Utilities 

Water Treatment Plant Supt. 

Asst. Power Plant Superintendent 

Town Engineer 



Tim Henry 
Patrick Brennan 

Mark Cousins 
Joseph Ciccotelli 

Jeffrey Turner 
Victoria Halmen 



Veterans Services District 



Terrance P. Hart 



Boards and Committees 



Affordable Housing Trust Fund Board 



James Warner, Chair 

Susan Monahan 

Michael Jones 

Glenn C. Gibbs 

James W. Foley 



Agricultural Commission 



Alternates 



Laura Russell, Chair 
Michael Marini 

Kat Kenney 

Donald Galicki 

Diane Bailot 

Diane Cassidy 

Royce Knowlton 

Fred Winthrop 

Mario Marini 



Athletic Playing Fields Study Committee 



James W. Foley, Chair 

Ken Swenson, Co-Chair 

Ken Taylor 

James Graffum 

Carl Nylen 

Susan Markos 

James Robertson 

Elizabeth Dorman 

Dianne Ross 

Kristen Grubbs 



Audit Committee 



Elizabeth Kilcoyne, Chair 

Robert White (Finance Com) 

Jeff Loeb (School Committee) 

Larry Pszenney 

William Callahan 



Board of Assessors 



Frank J. Ragonese, Chair 

John Moberger 

Karen L. Rassias 



Bay Circuit Trail Committee 



Lawrence G. Eliot, Chair 

Barbara Ostberg 

Mary Cunningham 

Ralph Williams 

Norman Marsh 

Linda Coan 

Diane Young 

Ed Murphy 



Cable Advisory Board 



Robert Ryan, Chair 
Gregory Parachojuk 



Ann Savage 

James Maloney 

Scott Ames 



Cemetery & Parks Commission 



Nicholas Markos, Chair 
Harry Argeropoulos 
Theodore Lemieux 



Commission on Energy Use & 
Climate Protection 



Ken Savoie, Chair 

Edward Rauscher 

Robert Markel 

Tim Henry 

Donald Bowen 

William Bingham 

Marc Simon 

Heidi Paek 

Michael Johnson 

Laura Dietz 

A. Adam Devoe 

Sarah Simon 



Community Development Plan 
Implementation Task Force 



Web Bingham, Chair 

Thomas Mayo 

William Gallagher 

Richard Kallman 

Ingrid F. Miles 

Glenn Gibbs 



Commuter Rail Committee 



Dorcas Rice, Chair 

Robert Waldner 

Joseph Carlin 

Chris Curry 

Paul Sanborn 



Conservation Commission 



Conservation Agent 



David Standley, Chair 

Jennifer Hughes, Vice Chair 

Barbara Beaman 

Sissy ffolliott 
Brian F. O'Neill 
Sharon Cushing 

Karl Kastorf 
David P. Pancoast 



10 



Constable 



Peter Dziadose 



Council On Aging 



Dorothy Butcher 

Cheryl Ferris 

Tone Kenney 

Elizabeth Nelson (Widge) 

Pat Parady 

Carol Poirier 

Claire Phillips 



Cultural Council 
(3 years) 



Terri Unger, Ch. 

Kathleen O'Reilly 

Michelle Shibley-McGrath 

Marianne Cellucci 

Sr. Patricia Rolinger 

William Skelton 

Linda Laterowicz 

Barta Hathaway 



Design Review Board 



Alternate Members 



Maiya Dos 

Dianna Pacella 

Chris Saulnier 

Justin M. Boucher 

(vacant) 

Ken Savoie 

Mary Kroesser 



Eight Towns & the Bay Committee 



Franz Ingelfinger 
Glenn Wood 



Electric Light Sub-Committee 



James W. Foley 

Charles D. Surpitski 

S. Michael Schaaf 

James Engel 

Edward Sklarz 



Fair Housing 



Tone Kenney 
Robert T. Markel 



11 



Government Study Committee 



GerryAnne Brown, Chair 

Jeremy Hathaway 

David Standley 

Laura Hamilton 

Laura Dietz 

Diana Hebert 



Hall-Haskell Standing 
Committee 



Theresa Stephens, Chair 

William Nelson 

William Thoen 

Stephanie Gaskins 

James C. Lahar 



Board of Health 



Susan C. Hubbard, Chair 

Spencer R. Amesbury, MD 

Charles Hill 



Historical Commission 



June S. Gahan, Chair 
Willard Maker 
Walter Pojasek 

Francis Wiedennman 

Peter Lampropoulos 
Marjorie H. Robie 

Nancy L. Thompson 



Housing Authority (5 years) 



Edgar Turner (State Appt.), Chair 

Tone Kenney 

Kenneth M. Blades 

Moriah K. Marsh 

Ronald Graves 



Housing Partnership 



Michael Schaaf 

James M. Warner 

Michael Jones 

Edward D. Dick 

Moriah Marsh 

William "Jay" Gallagher 

Donald Bowen 



Ipswich River Watershed 



12 



David Standley 



District Advisory Board 



Library Trustees 



George R. Gray, Chair 

Lawrence J. Pszenny 

Marie Louise Scudder 

Nancy L. Thompson 

Robert K. Weatherall 

Judith L. Rusin 

Helen Dan forth 

William Thoen 

Marion Frost 



MAPC Representative 



Christine Sandulli 



Mosquito Control Advisory Board 



Robert A. Gambale, Chair 

Lisa Galanis 

EdRuta 

Ernest Brockelbank. 

Anne Wallace 



Open Space Committee 



Glenn Hazelton, Chair 
David Standley 

Carl Nylen 

Ralph Williams 

Ruth Sherwood 

Wayne Castonguay 

Carolyn Britt 



Planning Board 

(5 years) 



Associate Member (2 years) 



Timothy A. Purinton, Chair 

Brian Hone 

Robert L. Weatherall 

Cathryn Chadwick 

James A. Manzi, Jr. 

Suzanne Benfield 



Public Safety Facilities Committee 



13 



James W. Foley. Chair 
Edward D. Dick 
Elizabeth Kilcoyne 
William Thoen 
Paul McGinley 
Roland Gallant 



John Morris 

Sean Cronin 

Willard Maker 

Jamie Fay 

Arthur Howe 

Gavin Keenan 

William A. Hodge 

Barry Hopping 

Jeffrey B. Loeb 

Richard L. Korb 



Recreation Committee 



Edith Cook, Chair 
Christina Mercier 

Anne Josephson 

Adam Gray 
Kathryn Sheppard 

Dan McCormick 
Matthew Bodwell 



Recycling Committee 



Suzanne Benfield, Chair 

Penny Devoe 

Mark Avenmarg 

Fiona Stewart 

Amy Whynott 

Judy Sedgewick 

Tim Bishop 

Elizabeth Kilcoyne (Assoc. Mem) 

Mike Judy (Assoc. Member) 
Jeremiah Read (Assoc. Member) 



Registrar of Voters 



Jeremy Hathaway 

Robert M. Stone 

Peter Ross 



Sandy Point Advisory Committee 



Joseph W. Parks 
Stanley W. Wood 



Shellfish Sub-Committee 



Elizabeth A. Kilcoyne, Co-Chair 

Charles D. Surpitski, Co-Chair 

Robert T. Markel 

Arnold "Pick" Thistlewood 

Wayne Castonguay 



14 



Bradford McGowan 
Anthony Murawski 

Gary Collum 
Michael Lambros 



Shade Tree & Beautification 
Committee 



James W. Foley, Chair 

Charles D. Surpitski 

Robert Gravino 

Armand Michaud 

Daniel Morrow 

Janet Craft 

Nancy Thompson 

Jennifer Tougas 

Martha Varrell 

Martha Chase 

Denise King 



Trust Fund Commission 



Robert K. Weatherall, Chair 

Jean Emerson 

Alexander Colby 



Wastewater Sub-Committee 



Elizabeth A. Kilcoyne 

Patrick J. McNally 

Raymond Morley 

James Engel 

Brian Kubaska 



Water Sub-Committee 



James W. Foley 

Ingrid Miles 

Raymond Morley 

James Engel 

Paul Brails ford 



Waterways Advisory Committee 



Ken Spellman, Chair 

Ronald Cameron 

Bill Callahan 

Evan Parker 

Jeffrey French 

John Wigglesworth 

Elton McCausland 



15 



Zoning Board of Appeals Robert A. Gambale, Ch. 

(5 years) Benjamin Fierro 

Robert Tragert 

Timothy S. Perkins 

Roger LeBlanc 

Robert Bodwell 



16 



RECORD OF ACTION TAKEN AT THE 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

May 13, 2008 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the legal voters of the Town of Ipswich met in the Ipswich High 
School/Middle School Performing Arts Center in said Town of Ipswich on Tuesday, May 13, 2008. A quorum 
being present (724 present - 200 required), the meeting was called to order by the Moderator Mr. A. James 
Grimes, III, at 8:00 p.m. 

Non-registered persons were given permission to attend the meetings as spectators and were seated on the floor 
in the back of the room on the left of the stage. 

A duly seconded motion was made to move the overflow of attendees to the gymnasium and to elect Mr. Ed 
Dick as moderator for the gymnasium. 

The meeting was briefly interrupted to issue proclamations to Mr. Edward Rauscher for his many years of 
service to the Town as a member of the Board of Selectmen and to Mr. Clarke Ziegler for his many years of 
service to the Town as a member of the Finance Committee. Ms. Elizabeth Kilcoyne presented the 
proclamations to Mr. Rauscher and Mr. Robert White presented the proclamations to Mr. Ziegler. 



ARTICLE 1 Consent Calendar 

On motion of Ms. Elizabeth Kilcoyne, duly seconded, it was 
VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to 

(1) Fix the salary and compensation of all elected Town Officers as presented in the town and school operating 
budgets; 

(2) Choose the following officers, viz: a Moderator for one [1] year; two [2] Selectmen for three [3] years; 
three [3] members of the School Committee for three [3] years; and one (1) member of the Housing 
Authority for five years, the above officers to be voted on one ballot at the YMCA Gymnasium, 110 
County Road, on TUESDAY, MAY 20, 2008. The polls shall open at 7:00 a.m. and shall close at 8:00 
p.m.; 

(3) Transfer $275,000 from surplus funds in the Electric Division to the General Fund; 

(4) Authorize the Board of Selectmen to appoint temporarily a member of said Board to Acting Town Manager 
for a limited period of time not to exceed the date of the 2009 Annual Town Meeting for purposes of 
vacation, leave, or absence in accordance with Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 268A, sections 20 and 
21 A; and 

(5) Rescind the unexpended balances of authorized but un-issued debt: Article 20 of the April 7, 2003, Annual 
Town Meeting (extension of the sanitary sewer); Article 12 of the October 16, 2006, Special Town Meeting 
(an addition to Article 20 of the 2003 ATM, extension to the sanitary sewer); Article 22 of the April 2, 
2007, Annual Town Meeting (High Street sewer extension); and Article 24 of the April 2, 2006, Annual 
Town Meeting (Library roof project). 

ARTICLE 2 Finance Committee Election 

17 



On motion of Mr. Robert White, duly seconded, it was 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to elect Larry Seidler to the Finance Committee for a term of three years. 



ARTICLE 3 

On motion of Mr. Edward Rauscher, duly seconded, it was 



FY'08 Town Budget Amendments 



VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to amend the Town's action taken under Articles 7 and 8 of the 
April 2, 2007, Annual Town Meeting (the FY'08 Municipal Operating Budget), to transfer: 



TRANSFERS: 



FROM 



Town Mgr 


11232-5308 


Labor Relations 


9,039.94 


Town Mgr 


11231-5113 


Salary 




Misc. Exp 


11931-5110 


Management Transfer 1 ,1 77.84 


Town Mgr 


11231-5112 


Appt Salary 




Animal Control 


12922-5246 


Radio Equip 


200.00 


Animal Control 


12922-5585 


Boarding Dogs 




Animal Control 


12922-5588 


Other Supplies 


670.00 


Animal Control 


12922-5721 


Out State Travel 150.00 


Animal Control 


12923-5818 


Vehicles 


11.00 


Animal Control 


12921-5121 


Temp PT 




Animal Control 


12921-5123 


Other Pay 




Elections 


11621-5123 


Other Pay 


346.24 


Elections 


11622-5383 


Other Purchased Svc 




Misc Exp 


11931-5110 


Management Transfer 


18,909.19 


Shellfish 


12961-5112 


Appt Salary 




Purchasing 


11361-5115 


Perm Wages 




Misc Exp 


11931-5110 


Management Trans fer 12,583.35 


Accounting 


11341-5113 


Salary 


14,600.00 


Accounting 


11341-5131 


Overtime 


900.00 


Assessor 


11371-5115 


Perm Wages 


1,520.00 


MIS 


11542-5511 


Training 


1,730.00 


Treasurer 


11381-5141 


Diff/Inc 


400.00 


Treasurer 


11382-5930 


Debt Issue Exp 


700.00 


Appeals Bd 


11742-5422 


Printed Forms 


150.00 


Appeals Bd 


11742-5304 


Advertising 


850.00 


Library 


16101-5116 


PermPT 


1,000.00 


Library 


16102-5512 


Books 


8,000.00 


Misc Exp 


11932-5311 


Other Consultants 


4,000.00 


Equip Maint 


14221-5115 


Perm Wages 


2,000.00 


Equip Maint 


14222-5215 


Gasoline 


9,000.00 


Equip Maint 


14222-5216 


Diesel Fuel 


13,000.00 



TO 

9,039.94 

1,177.84 



300.00 



80 
53 



346.24 



16,608.91 
2,300.28 



18 



Sanitation 


14312-5385 


Sanitary Collection 


115,000.00 


Highway 


14241-5115 


Perm Wages 


15,450.00 


Cemetery 


14912-5354 


Civic Observances 


1,045.00 


Bldg Insp 


12511-5123 


Other Pay 


12,000.00 


Bldg Insp 


12512-5311 


Other Consultants 


1,000.00 


Health 


15122-5304 


Advertising 


300.00 


Snow & Ice 


14231-5131 


Overtime 


26,412.49 


Snow & Ice 


14232-5215 


Gasoline 


7,750.23 


Snow & Ice 


14232-5216 


Diesel Fuel 


6,128.96 


Snow & Ice 


14232-5272 


Vehicle Rental 


30,411.00 


Snow & Ice 


14232-5481 


Oil & Lube 


175.00 


Snow & Ice 


14232-5484 


Parts Snow Repair 


54,649.92 


Snow & Ice 


14232-5539 


Other PW Supplies 


106,998.75 Snow & Ice 


Police 


12102-5381 


Ambulance 


20,000.00 


Police 


12102-5381 


Ambulance 


70,000.00 


Police 


12101-5131 


Overtime 


70,000.00 


Equip Maint. 


14221-5115 


Perm Wages 


3,000.00 


Consol Bldg 


14721-5115 


Perm Wages 


3,000.00 


Harbormaster 


12951-5123 


Other Pay 


4,154.00 


Harbormaster 


12952-5383 


Other Purch. Svcs. 


4,154.00 


APPROPRIATE: 








Town Ins. Recovery 


D6 110-48407 


Insurance Proceeds 


30,674.00 


Police 


12103-5818 


Vehicles 


30,674.00 



o that total FY'08 municipal operating budget, as so amended and inclusive of override debt service, shall total 
13,556,506 offset by revenues totaling $690,265 leaving an amount to be raised and assessed of $12,866,241. 

*See memorandum from Finance Director, Rita Negri, dated May 27, 2008, regarding dollar amount. 



kRTICLE 4 

>n motion of Ms. Ingrid Miles, duly seconded, it was 



Prior Year Unpaid Bills 



OTED UNANIMOUSLY, (4/5ths majority vote required), to appropriate from free cash the sum of 
621.58 to pay bills incurred in prior years and remaining unpaid: 



'epartment 
ecreation 



olice 



ire Department 



Vendor 


Amount 


Boston & Maine 


$ 1.00 




$ 1.00 


Ipswich Ford 


$ 73.18 


Ipswich Ford 


$ 118.71 


Brand Company 


$ 85.05 



19 



Fire Tech & Safety $ 55.00 

Sedaris Baer, MD $ 55.97 

American Messaging $ 231.67 

$621.58 

ARTICLE 5 FY'09 Municipal Operating Budget 
On motion of Ms. Elizabeth Kilcoyne, duly seconded, it was 
VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to 

( 1 ) Authorize the Town to enter into lease purchase contracts for office equipment having a term of fi vi 
years or less and; 

(2) Raise and appropriate the sum of $12,676,968 for the purposes indicated in the FY '09 Municipal 
Operating Budget as outlined in the Finance Committee Report, and that, in addition to the $12,676,96: 
the Town vote to raise and appropriate: 

for Excluded Debt Service $1,030,479 

for a Total Appropriation of $ 1 3,707,447; 

(3) and to transfer from available funds: 

from Free Cash $ 100,000 from Free 

Cash (restricted revenue - Library) $ 36,001 

from 4% Tourism $ 1,000 

from Library Construction Grant $ 60,300 from the 

overlay surplus $ 94,000 

Total Available Funds $ 291,301 

Leaving a net to be raised and assessed of $ 13,416,146 

ARTICLE 6 FY'09 School Budget 

On motion of Ms. Joan Arsenault, duly seconded, it was 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to 

(1) Authorize the Town to enter into lease-purchase contracts for office equipment having a term of five yeai | 
or less; and 

(2) Raise and appropriate the sum of $18,489,995 for the School Department budget for FY'09, and for the 
FY'09 School Department budget of $18,489,995, and 

(3) Transfer from available funds: 



20 



_ 



Free Cash $ 100,000 

Overlay Surplus $ 94,000 

Total Available Funds $ 194,000 

saving a net to be raised and assessed of. $ 1 8,295,995 



fXRTICLE 7 General Override 

)n motion of Mr. Barry Hopping, duly seconded, it was 

'OTED UNANIMOUSLY pursuant to the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 59, Section 
lC(g), to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,491 ,000 for the purposes of funding the FY'09 school 
epartment operating budget; said appropriation to be contingent upon the passage of an override referendum 
nder the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 59, Section 21 C(m); 

jid that this Town Meeting adjourn, after acting on all articles in the warrant, to vote by printed ballot on May 
0, 2008, at the YMCA Hall, County Road, the polls being open from 7:00 AM to 8:00 PM on the following 
uestion: 

Shall the Town of Ipswich be allowed to assess an additional $1,491,000 for the purpose of funding a 
applement to the FY'09 School Department operating budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2008?" 

kRTICLE 8 High School/Middle School Debt Service 

'n motion of Mr. Jeffrey Loeb, duly seconded, it was 

OTED UNANIMOUSLY to raise and appropriate the sum of $2,532,590 for FY'09 debt service payments 
lated to the construction and furnishing of the new Middle School and High School including, without 
mitation, moving expenses and expenses necessary to secure the former Whipple Middle School. 

>RTICLE 9 School Budget Amendment 

n motion of Ms. Diane Ross, duly seconded, it was 

OTED UNANIMOUSLY to amend the Town's action taken under Article 9 of the April 2, 2007, Annual 
Dwn Meeting, (the FY' 08 School Budget), as amended by Article 1 1 of the April 2, 2007, and Article 3 of the 
ctober 15, 2007, Special Town Meeting, by increasing the appropriation thereunder and by transferring the 
im of 47,619.98 from an incentive grant from Keyspan Corporation/National Grid deposited in the insurance 
covery fund (D-5) so that the total FY'08 school operating budget, as so amended and exclusive of override 
;bt service, shall increase from $18,509,599 to $18,557,218. *** 

"See memorandum from Finance Director, Rita Negri, dated May 27, 2008, regarding dollar amount. 



'TICLE 1 Capital Improvements Stabilization Fund Appropriation 

21 



On motion of Mr. James Foley, duly seconded, it was 

Voted by more than a 2/3 rd majority vote, one person opposed, (2/3 rd majority vote required), to amend 
Article 5 of the May 13, 2008, Annual Town Meeting (Municipal Operating Budget) with the following 
transfers from the Capital Improvement Stabilization Fund: 

1) Transfer $59,750 for maintenance and improvements to the Public Library and the Police and Fire 
Departments to the Facilities Department; and 

2) Transfer $50,000 to fund the initial phase of a window replacement program at Town Hall to the Facilities 
Department; and 

3) Transfer $25,000 to the Department of Public Works to fund a feasibility study to replace the existing 
Highway garage; and 

4) Transfer $8,500 to the MIS Department to fund a needs assessment for the Town's Geographic Information 
System (GIS); and 

Amend the motion to include: 

5) Transfer $16,818 to the MIS Department for the third of a five year program to replace desktop computers; 
and 

6) Transfer $20,000 to the Building Department to install permit tracking software to improve coordination 
among regulatory and permitting boards and departments; and 

7) Transfer $17,000 to the Planning Department for the Town match for $57,400 in state funds to undertake tl 
planning and design phase of the North Green Improvements project; so that the amount transferred from the 
Capital Improvements Stabilization Fund totals $197,068. 

ARTICLE 1 1 Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School Budget 

On motion of Mr. Raymond Morley, duly seconded, it was 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to raise and appropriate the sum of $574,195 for the Town's share of the FY'09 
annual operating, capital and debt service expenses of the Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High Schoc 
District. J 

ARTICLE 1 2 FY'08 Water & Sewer Budgets 

On motion of Mr. Patrick McNally, duly seconded, it was 
VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to 

1) Raise and appropriate the sum of $2,397,492 for the FY'09 operating, debt service, and capital expenses of 
the Water Division, Department of Utilities, said sum to be offset in part by the water surplus of $2,066, the 
balance of said appropriation to be met by revenues of the Water Division during FY'09; and 

2) Raise and appropriate the sum of $1,692,737 for the FY'09 operating, debt service, and capital expenses of 
the Wastewater Division, Department of Utilities, said sum to be offset in part by the Wastewater surplus of 

22 



S207,365, the balance of said appropriation to be met by revenues of the Wastewater Division during FY'09. 

RTICLE 13 Equipment Bond 

)n motion of Mr. Edward Rauscher, duly seconded, it was 

/OTED UNANIMOUSLY, (2/3 rd majority vote required), to 

1) Appropriate the sum of $600,000 to purchase heavy equipment for the Department of Public Works 
($250,000) and to fund overhaul of a Fire Department pumper truck ($100,000) and to expand and 
upgrade the sidewalks program ($250,000) and; 

(2) Raise this appropriation by authorizing the treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to 
issue bonds or serial notes under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, as amended. 

RTICLE 14 Chapter 90 

>n motion of Mr. James Foley, duly seconded, it was 

'OTED UNANIMOUSLY, (2/3 rd majority vote required), to appropriate the sum of $327,214 under the 
rovisions of Chapter 90 of the General Laws to obtain any materiel, equipment and/or services incidental 
lereto; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire easements in conjunction therewith by purchase, 
ift, lease, eminent domain or otherwise; and in the furtherance of the projects, to authorize the Board of 
electmen to apply for, accept, and expend any federal, state and/or private grants without further appropriation; 
id to meet this appropriation by transferring an equal sum from Chapter 90 available funds. 



ITICLE 15 Revolving Funds: Council on Aging; Historical Commission; 

Health Division; Shellfish Department 

n motion of Mr. Patrick McNally, duly seconded, it was 

OTED UNANIMOUSLY to re-authorize for FY'09 the following revolving funds established under 
lassachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 53E Vi\ 

) A Council on Aging Revolving Fund, to be funded through activity fees and to be used to pay for special 
activities, expendable supplies and/or part-time wages, with no more than $100,000 to be expended by the 
Council on Aging from monies transferred into said fund during FY'09; and 

) An Historical Commission Revolving Fund, to pay for preservation of Town records and the purchase of 
expendable supplies, with no more than $5,000 to be expended by the Historical Commission from monies 
transferred into said fund during FY'09, with the source of such funds being the sale of publications such as 
replicas of the Declaration of Independence and other historical documents; and 

) A Health Division Revolving Fund, the use of said fund to finance additional part-time help in the Health 
Division and to pay related expenditures with no more than $7,000 to be expended by the Health Division 

23 



in FY'09 from funds transferred into said fund during FY'09, with the source of such funds being housing: 
code inspection fees; and 

(4) A Shellfish Department Revolving Fund, to be funded through a surcharge of $50 on commercial shellfisr 
licenses, the use of said fund to enhance the shellfish resources of the town under the guidance of the 
Shellfish Advisory Board and Town Manager with no more than $7,000 to be expended from the Shellfisr 
Department Revolving Fund during Fiscal 2009. 



ARTICLE 16 Committee Reports 

On motion of Ms. Elizabeth Kilcoyne, duly seconded, it was 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to accept the reports of, and continue the following committees as standing 
committees of the Town: the Historic District Study Committee; the Commuter Rail Committee; Ipswich 
Coalition on Youth; Hall-Haskell Committee; the Open Space & Recreation Committee and the Ad Hoc 
Committee examining the Feoffees of the Grammar School. 

At 11:25 p.m., after the completion of the vote of Article 16, a duly seconded motion was made to continue 
until all articles had been moved and voted on. 

ARTICLE 17 Open Space Program 

On motion of Mr. James Foley, duly seconded, it was 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to add the following parcel to the Open Space Parcels List (as referenced in Artie 
18 of the Warrant for the April 3, 2000, Annual Town Meeting) on file in the office of the Director of Planninj 
and Development and in the Office of the Town Clerk, said changes having been placed on file in the office ol 
the Director of Planning and Development and in the Office of the Town Clerk by April 15, 2008: 

Land now/formerly of The Estate of Eugene R. Lynch, 215 Linebrook Road, also known as Assessor's Map 
29C Parcel 3, consisting of approximately 5.4 acres. This property is acquired for agricultural purposes and fc 
water supply protection pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Sections 39, 41 and 15B, and 
Article 97 of the Amendments to the Massachusetts Constitution, and is under the control of the Board of 
Selectmen acting as the Board of Water Commissioners for the Town of Ipswich. 

ARTICLE 18 Riverwalk Bonds 

On motion of Ms. Ingrid Miles, duly seconded, it was 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to amend the Town's actions taken under Article 24 of the Warrant for the April ' 
2003, Annual Town Meeting ("Riverwalk Bonds") and Article 22 of the Warrant for the April 5, 2004, Annual 
Town Meeting (Riverwalk Supplemental Funding) by changing the purpose for which the bonds were to be 
expended from: "...survey, design, and construct a pedestrian bridge across the Ipswich River, to be located ir 
the area of South Main Street and Union Street, and to obtain any materiel and/or services incidental thereto", 
to: ".. .survey, design, and construct a pedestrian bridge across the Ipswich River, to be located in the area of I 
South Main Street and Union Street, and to obtain any materiel and/or services incidental thereto, and further ii 
conjunction with said project, to survey, design, and construct improvements such as crosswalks, landscaping, 
sidewalks and foot paths, in the general vicinity of the Riverwalk entrance on South Main Street, and along thei 
river near the Riverwalk entrance off Union Street, and to obtain any materiel and/or services incidental thereto ) 

24 



RTICLE 19 Wind Turbine Project 

)n motion of Mr. Edward Rauscher, duly seconded, it was 

/OTED UNANIMOUSLY, (2/3 rd majority vote required), to appropriate $4,242,000 to survey, design, 
mrchase and undertake construction of a wind turbine electric generator and associated transmission equipment 
t the end of Town Farm Road on property owned by the Town; and that to meet this appropriation by 
uthorizing the Treasurer to: 

l) With the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to issue $4,242,000 in bonds or serial notes under the 
rovisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44 as amended or any other enabling authority; and 

) With the approval of the Board of Selectmen and School Committee, to issue a portion of such bonds, 
jrrently estimated in the amount of $1,600,000, as Clean Renewable Energy Bonds under section 54 of the 
iternal Revenue Code; 

nd that this Town Meeting adjourns, after acting on all articles in the warrant, to vote by printed ballot on May 
1 2008, at the YMCA Hall, County Road, the polls being open from 7:00 AM to 8:00 PM on the following 
jestion: 

Shall the Town vote to appropriate $4,242,000 to survey, design, purchase and undertake construction of a 
ind turbine electric generator and associated transmission equipment at the end of Town Farm Road on 
operty owned by the Town; and to authorize the Treasurer (1) with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to 
sue $4,242,000 in bonds or serial notes under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44 as 
nended or any other enabling authority; and (2) with the approval of the Board of Selectmen and the School 
ommittee, to issue a portion of such bonds, currently estimated in the amount of $1,600,000, as Clean 
snewable Energy Bonds under section 54 of the Internal Revenue Code." 

TICLE 20 Personal Property Assessments 

a motion of Ms. Ingrid Miles, duly seconded, it was 

OTED UNANIMOUSLY to accept Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 59, Section 5(54), added by 
lapter 159 of the Acts of 2000, to permit the Assessors of the Town of Ipswich to establish a minimum fair 
sh value of $10,000 for personal property accounts to be taxed, starting in FY 2009. The Town Assessor 
commends the minimum cash value be set at $3,500 and as such move that the minimum cash value be set at 
,500 for personal properly accounts to be taxed, starting in FY 2009. 

TICLE 21 Inter-municipal Agreements 

i motion of Ms. Elizabeth Kilcoyne, duly seconded, it was 

3TED UNANIMOUSLY to authorize the Selectmen to enter into inter-municipal agreements with one or 
)re municipalities to permit member municipalities to lease municipal equipment or vehicles from one 
other, to acquire jointly, by lease, purchase or otherwise, equipment or vehicles or to share operational costs 
1 such equipment or vehicles, all on terms satisfactory to the Board of Selectmen. 

TICLE 22 Reconsideration 

25 



On motion of Ms. Elizabeth Kilcoyne, duly seconded, it was 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY that action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Meeting adjourned at 12:10 a.m. on May 14, 2008. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Pamela Z. Carakatsane, CMMC, CMC 
Town Clerk 



26 



RECORD OF ACTION TAKEN AT THE 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

OCTOBER 20, 2008 

'ursuant to the foregoing warrant, the legal voters of the Town of Ipswich met in the Ipswich High 
Ichool/Middle School Performing Arts Center in said Town of Ipswich on Monday, October 20, 2008. A 
[uorum being present (235 present - 200 required), the meeting was called to order by the Moderator Mr. A. 
ames Grimes, III, at 7:40 p.m. 

Jon-registered persons were given permission to attend the meetings as spectators and were seated on the floor 
i the back of the room on the left of the stage. 



.RTICLE 1 



PRIOR YEAR UNPAID BILLS 



>n motion of Ms. Ingrid Miles, duly seconded, it was 
OTED UNANIMOUSLY to 

3propriate the sum of $4,468.72 to pay unpaid bills incurred in prior years and remaining unpaid: 



ACCOUNT 



Consolidated Maintenance 



r ire Dept./Emergency Mgt 



Veterans' Services 



own Manager 



urchasing/Risk Mgt 



VENDOR 

Verizon Wireless 
David Horwitz Associates 
Standard Electric 
Ipswich Utilities 

RanMark Unlimited 
American Messaging 

Beacon Family Medicine 
Dept. of Veterans' Affairs 
Lahey Clinic 



Northeast Hospital Corp. 

North Shore Urological 

Inc. 

The Ipswich Center 

Vermont Tennis Court Surfacing 



Community Newspapers 
North Shore Magnetic 
Imaging 

27 



AMOUNT TOTAL 



50.01 




180.00 




42.94 




169.41 


$442.36 


300.00 




890.98 


$1,109.98 


25.08 




16.00 




11.00 




10.00 




16.00 




18.82 




33.48 




15.00 




100.00 


$245.38 


2,249.00 


$2,249.00 


91.00 




250.00 


$341.00 



TOTAL FOR TOWN 

DEPTS. $4,468.72 

and to meet this appropriation by transferring $4,468.72 from free cash. 

ARTICLE 2 FY'09 TOWN BUDGET AMENDMENTS 

On motion of Ms. Elizabeth Kilcoyne, duly seconded, it was 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to 

amend the Town 's action taken under Article 5 of the May 13, 2008, Annual Town Meeting (the FY'09 
Municipal Operating Budget) as follows: 

1. appropriate $100,000 to be added to the DPW Snow and Ice Division budget (14232-5272) to increase 
funding for snow and ice operations for the winter of 2008-09; and 

2. transfer $30,564 from the Waterways Improvement Account into the General Fund to support the 
operations of the Harbormaster; and 

3. transfer $2,875 from free cash to the Treasurer/Collector (1 138-51 12) for services as Tax Title 
Custodian; and 

4. transfer $1 0,000 from free cash to the Recreation Gift Account to continue the five year funding 
program to replace the wooden play structure at Bialek Park; 

so that the total Fiscal 2009 municipal operating budget of $13,707,447, as so amended and inclusive of 
override debt service, shall total $13,850,886, leaving the amount to be raised and assessed as $13,516,14* 

ARTICLE 3 FY'09 SCHOOL BUDGET AMENDMENTS 

On motion of Ms. Dianne Ross, duly seconded, it was 
VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to 

amend the Town 's action taken under Article 6 of the May 13, 2008, Annual Town Meeting (the FY09 
School Department Operating Budget), as amended by Article 7 of the May 13, 2008, Annual Town Meetin , 
as follows: 

1 . transfer $56,3 1 5.29 from free cash to the School Department for Medicaid funds deposited into the 
General Fund during Fiscal 2008; and so that the total appropriation under this article will increase fro 
$19,980,995 to $20,037,310.29, leaving an amount to be raised and assessed as $19,786,995. 






28 



ARTICLE 4 CHAPTER 90 

)n motion of Mr. James Foley, duly seconded, it was 
OTED UNANIMOUSLY to 

1. amend Article 1 1 of the April 3, 2006, Annual Town Meeting reducing the acceptance of $392,000 in 
Chapter 90 funds to $262,413; and 

2. amend Article 15 of the April 2, 2007, Annual Town Meeting reducing the acceptance of $328,017 in 
Chapter 90 funds to $327,836. 

RTICLE 5 CITIZENS' PETITION 

n motion of Ms. Linda Alexson, duly seconded, it was 
OTED UNANIMOUSLY BY A VOICE VOTE to 

[definitely postpone this article. 

[s. Linda Alexson withdrew her initial motion to instruct the Board of Selectmen to immediately terminate the 
vo (2) existing private shellfish bed leases that were approved by the Selectmen in 2001 and open those 
lellfish beds to the public. 

RTICLE 6 SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS AT MBTA GRADE CROSSINGS 

i motion of Mr. Charles Surpitski, duly seconded, it was 

OTED (60 YES - 4 NO) AFTER A UNANIMOUS MOTION TO MOVE THE QUESTION to 

propriate the sum of $68, 700 to design safety improvements at the Topsfield Road grade crossing and 
her public grade crossings of the MBTA within the Town, and authorize the Treasurer, with the approval 
the Board of Selectmen, to borrow $68, 700 under G.L. c. 44, § 8 or any other enabling authority to meet 
is appropriation. 

iUTCLE 7 375TH ANNIVERSARY 

i motion of Mr. Patrick McNally, duly seconded, the motion 

dLED (77 YES - 101 NO) to transfer $30,000 from free cash as the Town's portion of the funding for the 
5 Anniversary celebration of the founding of the Town of Ipswich. 



29 



ARTICLE 8 



STORMWATER BYLAW 



On motion of Ms. Ingrid Miles, duly seconded, it was 
VOTED UNANIMOUSLY BY A VOICE VOTE to 
amend the General Bylaws of the Town of Ipswich by adding: 
"CHAPTER XIX. STORMWATER MANAGEMENT 



SECTION 1. 



INTRODUCTION 



The harmful impacts of contaminated stormwater runoff, increased peak flows and volumes of runoff, decreas 
groundwater replenishment, and erosion and sedimentation are: 
impairment of water quality and flow in lakes, ponds, streams, rivers, wetlands and groundwater; contaminate 
loss of drinking water supplies; alteration or destruction of aquatic and wildlife habitat controlling discharges 
municipal storm drain system and to waters of the Commonwealth in the Town of Ipswich; and economic loss 
structural damage caused by flooding. 

This Bylaw establishes minimum requirements and procedures to control the adverse effects of increased stor 
runoff and nonpoint source pollution associated with new development and redevelopment. This Bylaw also , 
prohibits non-storm-water discharges into the municipal storm drain system and waters of the Commonwealtl 
Ipswich, except as exempted under Section 6 of this Bylaw. 



SECTION 2. 



PURPOSE 



A. The purpose of this Bylaw is to protect, maintain, and enhance the public health, safety, water supply, 
environment, and general welfare by controlling discharges to the municipal storm drain system and to waters 
Commonwealth in the Town of Ipswich. This Bylaw establishes minimum requirements and procedures to C( 
the adverse effects of increased stormwater runoff and nonpoint source pollution associated with new develop 
and redevelopment. This Bylaw also prohibits non-stormwater discharges into the municipal storm drain syst 
waters of the Commonwealth in Ipswich, except as exempted under Section 6 of this Bylaw. This Bylaw seel 
meet that purpose through the following objectives: 

a) Minimize damage to public and private property and infrastructure; 

b) Safeguard the public health, safety, environment, and general welfare of the public; 

c) Protect water resources and prevent contamination of drinking water supplies; 

d) Require practices that eliminate soil erosion and sedimentation on construction sites; 

e) Require practices that control the volume and rate of stormwater runoff resulting from land disturbanc 
activities; 

f) Promote infiltration of water into the ground and mimic natural hydrologic conditions; 

g) Maintain the natural hydrologic regime in streams, rivers, wetlands, ponds, and groundwater; 

h) Ensure that soil erosion and sedimentation control measures and stormwater runoff control practices ai 
incorporated into the site planning and design process and are implemented and maintained; 

i) Require practices to control waste at construction sites, such as discarded building materials, concrete 
washout, chemicals, litter and sanitary waste, which may cause adverse impacts to water quality; 

j) Comply with state and federal statutes and regulations relating to stormwater discharges; and 

k) Establish the Town of Ipswich's legal authority and capacity to ensure compliance with the provisions 
Bylaw through funding, permitting, inspection, monitoring and enforcement. 

30 i 



. This Bylaw and the regulations, criteria, policies, and guidance adopted or promulgated pursuant to this Bylaw, 
lid any town stormwater management funding mechanism created pursuant to this Bylaw, form an integral part of 
le Stormwater Management Program for the Town of Ipswich. This Bylaw is intended to meet certain provisions of 
le Town's requirements to comply with the Clean Water Act under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination 
ystem (NPDES) Regulations for the Revisions of the Water Pollution Control Program Addressing Storm Water 
ischarges (Phase I and II Rules). 

ECTION 3. DEFINITIONS 

3r the purposes of this Bylaw, the following shall mean: 

LTER: Any activity that will measurably change the ability of a ground surface to absorb water or will change 
:isting surface drainage patterns. Alter may be similarly represented as "alteration of drainage characteristics" and 
onducting land disturbance activities." 

LTERATION OF DRAINAGE CHARACTERISTICS: Any activity on an area of land that changes the water 
lality, force, direction, timing or location of runoff flowing from the area. Such changes include: change from 
stributed runoff to confined, discrete discharge; change in the volume of runoff from the area; change in the peak 
te of runoff from the area; and change in the recharge to groundwater on the area. 

PPLICANT: Any person requesting authorization to connect to the Ipswich Municipal Separate Storm Sewer 
/stem (I MS4) or for a proposed land-disturbance activity. 

EST MANAGEMENT PRACTICE (BMP): A best reasonably available activity, procedure, restraint, or structural 
lprovement that significantly reduces the quantity and/or improves the quality of stormwater runoff. 

2TTER SITE DESIGN: Site design approaches and techniques that can reduce a site's impact on watersheds and 
iter resources through the use of nonstructural stormwater water management practices. Better site design includes 
ithout limitation) conserving and protecting natural areas and green space, providing substantial buffer zones for 
nsitive resources, reducing impervious cover, and using natural features for stormwater management. 

.EAN WATER ACT: The Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. § 125 1 et seq.) as hereafter amended. 

3NNECTION and DISCHARGE PERMIT: Written authorization by the Permitting Authority pursuant to Sections 
> and 7 for the construction and/or maintenance of a direct connection to the I MS4 of a discharge of storm water 
d of non-storm water from a sump pump or other source of collected stormwater. The Permit shall be for the 
rposes of protecting and ensuring the integrity and proper operation of the I MS4 and preventing pollution of the 
iters of the Commonwealth. 

)NSTRUCTION PHASE: The period of time during which a site is under construction, from the initial alteration 
the existing conditions to the completion of all site alteration, including installation of any utilities, roadways, 
veways, and buildings, and all changes in vegetative cover. 

SCHARGE OF POLLUTANTS: The addition of any pollutant or combination of pollutants into the Ipswich MS4 
into the waters of the United States or Commonwealth. 

iVELOPMENT: Any modification of land to accommodate a new use or expansion of use, usually involving 
istruction. 



31 



EROSION: The wearing away of the land surface by natural or artificial forces such as wind, water, ice, gravi 
vehicle traffic and the subsequent detachment and transportation of soil particles. 



EROSION AND SEDIMENTATION CONTROL PLAN: A document containing narrative, drawings and det 
developed by a qualified Registered Professional Engineer (PE) which includes best management practices or 
equivalent measures designed to control surface runoff, erosion and sedimentation, reduce pollution and impro 
recharge of groundwater during pre-construction and construction related land disturbance activities. 

GROUNDWATER: Water beneath the surface of the ground and not confined in a conduit or container. 

ILLICIT CONNECTION: A surface or subsurface drain or conveyance which allows an illicit discharge into 
Ipswich storm drain system, regardless of whether said connection was previously allowed, permitted, or appn 
before the effective date of this Bylaw. 

ILLICIT DISCHARGE: Direct or indirect discharge to the Ipswich storm drain system that is not composed e 
of stormwater, including without limitation sewage, process wastewater, or wash water, except as exempted in 
Section 6 of this Bylaw or in implementing regulations. The term does not include a discharge in compliance ^ 

NPDES Discharge Permit or resulting from fire fighting activities. 

IMPERVIOUS SURFACE: Any material or structure on or above the ground that prevents water from infiltra I 
underlying soil. Impervious surface includes without limitation roofs, paved roads, driveways, parking lots an 
paved areas. 

INFILTRATION: Replenishing groundwater through recharge or seepage of precipitation or stormwater runo 

IPSWICH MUNICIPAL SEPARATE STORM SEWER SYSTEM (I MS4) or STORM DRAIN SYSTEM: T 
system of conveyances designed, constructed, and used for collecting or conveying stormwater, including any I 
gutter, curb, inlet, piped storm drain, pumping facility, retention or detention basin, man-made or altered drair 'j 
channel, reservoir, and other drainage structure that together comprise the storm drainage system owned or op 
by the Town of Ipswich. 

LAND-DISTURBING ACTIVITY and/or LAND DISTURBANCE: Any activity that causes a change in the 
position, elevation or location of soil, sand, rock, gravel, or similar earth material or that removes vegetative c 
from the land. 

LOW IMPACT DEVELOPMENT (LID): An approach to environmentally friendly land use planning and sto 
management that includes a suite of landscaping and design techniques that attempt to maintain the natural, p: 
developed ability of a site to manage rainfall. LID techniques typically preserve natural drainage characterist 
and/or capture water on site, filter it through vegetation, and let it soak into the ground where it can recharge 1 
water table rather than becoming surface runoff. 

MASSACHUSETTS HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT MUNICIPAL SEPARATE STORM SEWER SYSTEM c 
STORM DRAIN SYSTEM (MHD MS4): The system of conveyances designed, constructed, and used for col \ 
or conveying stormwater, including any street, gutter, curb, inlet, piped storm drain, pumping facility, retentic ; 
detention basin, man-made or altered drainage channel, reservoir, and other drainage structure that together a! 
the storm drainage system owned or operated by the Massachusetts Highway Department within the boundari 
the Town of Ipswich. 

■ 

MASSACHUSETTS STORMWATER MANAGEMENT STANDARDS: The Standards are issued by the M 
Department of Environmental Protection, as amended, under state regulations 310 CMR 10.00 and 314 CMR {I 

32 



he Standards address stormwater impacts through implementation of a set of performance standards to reduce or 
revent pollutants from reaching water bodies and control the quantity and peak flows of runoff from a site. 

ATIONAL POLLUTANT DISCHARGE ELIMINATION SYSTEM (NPDES) GENERAL PERMIT FOR STORM 
/ATER DISCHARGES: A permit issued by United States Environmental Protection Agency or jointly with the 
tate that authorizes the discharge of stormwater to waters of the United States. 

ON-STORMWATER DISCHARGE: Discharge to the municipal storm drain system not composed entirely of 
ormwater. 

-RMITTING AUTHORITY: For the implementation of all actions and procedures authorized by the Bylaw, the 
Dard of Selectmen or their designees(s), provided that the designee(s) shall not be the permittee and provided 
rther that the authority granted by Section 7 (H) may not be delegated. 

ERSON: An individual, partnership, association, firm, company, trust, corporation, agency, authority, department or 
•litical subdivision of the Commonwealth or the federal government, to the extent permitted by law, and any officer, 
iployee, or agent of such person. 

)LLUTANT: Any element or property of sewage, agricultural, industrial or commercial waste, runoff, leachate, 
ated effluent, or other matter, whether originating at a point or nonpoint source, that is or may be introduced into 
y municipal storm drain system or waters of the Commonwealth. 

)LLUTION: The presence in the environment of pollutants in quantities or characteristics which are or may be 
jurious to human, plant or animal life or to property or which unreasonably interfere with the comfortable 
joyment of life and property through such areas as may be affected thereby. 

IE-DEVELOPMENT CONDITIONS: The conditions that exist on a site at the time that plans for the site or land 
i submitted to the town, to the extent that such conditions are the result of natural processes and/or legally 
thorized activities. Where development is constructed or permitted in phases, the existing conditions at the time 
or to the first plan submission shall establish pre-development conditions. 

)ST-DEVELOPMENT CONDITIONS: The conditions that reasonably may be expected or anticipated to exist 
er completion of the land development activity on a specific site or tract of land. Post-development refers to the 
ase of a new development or redevelopment project after completion, and does not refer to the construction phase 
a project. 

„OCESS WASTEWATER: Water which, during manufacturing or processing, comes into direct contact with or 
ults from the production or use of any material, intermediate product, finished product, or waste product. Process 
stewater includes water which has increased in temperature as a result of manufacturing or other processes. 

-CHARGE: The process by which groundwater is replenished by precipitation through the percolation of runoff 
i surface water through the soil, or by injection of collected precipitation, run off or adequately treated wastewater. 

DEVELOPMENT: Development, rehabilitation, expansion, demolition or phased projects that disturb the ground 
face or increase the impervious area on previously developed sites. 

DIMENT: Mineral or organic soil material that is transported by gravity, wind and/or water, from its origin to 
)ther location; the product of erosion processes. 

DIMENT ATION: The process or act of deposition of sediment. 

33 



SITE: Any parcel of land or area of property where land-disturbing activities are, were, or will be performed. 

SOIL: Any aggregated particles of earth, clay, sand, rock, gravel, or similar material. 

STORMWATER/RUNOFF: Rainwater, snowmelt and/or other water that flows off impervious surfaces and ai 
or over the ground surface rather than being absorbed into the soil. 

STORMWATER MANAGEMENT: The planning, design, construction, regulation, improvement, repair, 
maintenance and operation of facilities and programs designed to protect water quality, flood plains, flood cont 

grading, infiltration, erosion and sediment control. 

i 

STORMWATER MANAGEMENT PERMIT: Written authorization by the Permitting Authority pursuant to S 
5 A and 7 for stormwater management at and for construction/development sites during and subsequent to alter;, 
and construction. 

TOXIC OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL OR WASTE: Any material, which because of its quantity, concentrai 
chemical, corrosive, flammable, reactive, toxic, infectious or radioactive characteristics, either separately or in ! 
combination with any substance or substances, constitutes a present or potential threat to human health, safety, 
welfare, or to the environment. Toxic or hazardous materials include any synthetic organic chemical, petroleur 
product, heavy metal, radioactive or infectious waste, acid and alkali, and any substance defined as Toxic or 
Hazardous under M.G.L. Ch.21C and Ch.21E, and the Massachusetts DEP Regulations at 310 CMR 30.000 ar 
CMR 40.000. 

USER: The owner of record of a property subject to the stormwater user fee. 

WATERCOURSE: A natural or man-made channel through which water flows, or a stream of water, includin 
without limitation, a river, brook, or conduit. 

WATERS OF THE COMMONWEALTH: All waters within the jurisdiction of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, including, without limitation, rivers, streams, lakes, ponds, springs, impoundments, estuaries, 
wetlands, coastal waters, and groundwater. 

WASTEWATER: Any sanitary waste, sludge, septage, or septic tank or cesspool contents or discharge, and/c 
process wastewater. 

WETLANDS: Any bank, riverfront area, freshwater wetland, coastal wetland, beach, dune, flat, marsh, mea 
swamp bordering on the ocean or on any estuary, creek, river, stream, pond, or lake, or any land under said we 
any land subject to tidal action, coastal storm flowage, or flooding. 

SECTION 4. AUTHORITY 

This Bylaw is adopted under authority granted by the Home Rule Amendment of the Massachusetts Constituti 
the Home Rule statutes, and pursuant to the regulations of the federal Clean Water Act found at 40 CFR 122.3 

SECTION 5. APPLICABILITY 

A. No person may undertake any alteration of drainage characteristics, which alteration may include, with 
limitation, clearing, grading, and excavation that will result in a land disturbance exceeding an area of 
square feet, or more than 50% of a parcel or lot, whichever is less, without a Storm Water Managemen 
Permit from the Permitting Authority; except for an activity which requires Site Plan Review, Definitr 
Subdivision Approval, or a Special Permit from the Planning Board, or which requires an Order of Coi 
from the Conservation Commission. 

34 



I B. No person may create or maintain a direct connection or discharge to the MS4 without a Connection and 
Discharge Permit from the Permitting Authority. 

I C. Section 5 shall take effect on July 1, 2009. 

CCTION 6. EXEMPTIONS and WAIVERS 

Exemptions 

emptions from this Bylaw apply to the following activities, provided that a project is solely comprised of any one 
these activities: 

. a) As authorized in the NPDES General Permit for Stormwater Discharges from Small MS4s for Massachusetts, 
activities identified in Section 5 A that are subject to jurisdiction under the Wetlands Protection Act and/or the 
Ipswich Wetlands Protection Bylaw. 

b) Activities identified in Section 5A that require Site Plan Review, Definitive Subdivision or Special Permit 
Approval from the Planning Board. 

c) Any work or projects for which all necessary approvals and permits have been issued before the effective date 
of this Bylaw. 

d) Activities identified in section 5 that are subject to the current Massachusetts Highway Department Drainage 
Connection Policy; provided that no interagency agreement between the MHD and the Town has been 
executed providing for Town jurisdiction over drainage tie-in permits subject to the MHD Drainage 
Connection Policy. 

e) Construction of any fence that will not alter existing terrain or drainage patterns. 

f) Maintenance of existing landscaping, gardens or lawn areas associated with a single family dwelling. 

g) Construction of patios, walkways, driveways and swimming pools, where the cumulative area of such 
construction on the lot subsequent to passage of this Bylaw is less than 10,000 square feet or less than 50% of 
the lot area, whichever is less. 

h) Replacement of existing wells or septic system on lots having an existing dwelling, with use of BMPs to 

prevent erosion, sedimentation and release of pollutants, 
i) Construction of utilities (gas, water, sanitary sewer, electric, telephone, cable television, etc.) other than 

drainage which will not alter terrain, ground cover, or drainage patterns, so long as BMPs are used to prevent 

erosion, sedimentation and release of pollutants., 
j) Emergency repairs to any existing utilities (gas, water, sanitary sewer, electric, telephone, cable television, 

etc.) and emergency repairs to any stormwater management facility or practice that poses a threat to public 

health or safety, designated by the Permitting Authority. Where such activity is subject to the jurisdiction of 

the Conservation Commission, the work shall not proceed without the issuance of an Emergency Certification 

by the Commission, 
k) Normal maintenance and improvement of land in agricultural or aquaculrural use, as defined by the Wetlands 

Protection Act regulation 3 1 CMR 10.04. 
1) Routine maintenance that is performed to maintain the original line and grade, hydraulic capacity or the 

original purpose of the site. 

Allowable Non-Storm Water Discharges 

e following non-storm water discharges do not require a Connection and Discharge Permit if they will not be 
ectly connected to or discharging to the MS4 via a pipe, hose or other direct conveyance system, or if the 
rmitting Authority determines that such a discharge will not likely contribute pollutants to the MS4. 

a) Any discharges associated with municipal fire fighting activities (See Note 1); 

35 



b) water line flushing; 

c) diverted stream flows; 

d) rising ground waters; 

e) uncontaminated ground water infiltration (as defined at 40 CFR 35.2005(20)); 

f) uncontaminated pumped ground water (See Note 2); 

g) discharge from potable water sources; 
h) foundation and footing drains; 

i) air conditioning condensation; 

j) individual resident car washing; 

k) flows from riparian habitats, springs, and wetlands; 

1) de-chlorinated swimming pool discharges; and 

m) Residential building wash waters, without detergents. 

(Note 1) Discharges or flows from fire fighting activities occur during emergency situations. The permittee is i 
expected to evaluate fire fighting discharges with regard to pollutant contributions. Therefore, these discharge} 
authorized as allowable non-storm water discharges, unless identified by the United States Environmental Proli 
Agency as significant sources of pollutants to Waters of the United States. 

(Note 2) Discharges from pumps or other devices evacuating ground water from beneath basement floors and 
spaces of residential buildings ("sump pumps") do not require a Connection and Discharge Permit; except in c 
releases of oils or hazardous materials within or into such basements or crawl spaces, or if the Permitting Autl 
determines that such a discharge will likely contribute pollutants to the MS4. 

C. Waivers 

The Permitting Authority may waive strict compliance with any requirement of Sections 5 and 7 of this Bylav 
rules and regulations promulgated hereunder, where: 

a) such action is allowed by and does not conflict with federal or state law, or any Ipswich by-lav 
regulations; 

b) is in the public interest; and 

c) is not inconsistent with the purpose and intent of this Bylaw. 

Any applicant may submit a written request for a waiver as part of the application process. Such a request sha 
accompanied by an explanation or documentation supporting the waiver request and demonstrate that strict 
application of the Bylaw or regulation is not necessary to meet the purposes or objectives of the Bylaw. 

However, a waiver from this Bylaw and/or regulations promulgated pursuant to this Bylaw does not relieve th 
applicant or land owner of any obligations for compliance with other federal, state or local statutes, regulation 
permits. 

SECTION 7. ADMINISTRATION 

A. Authority. The primary authority for the administration, implementation, and enforcement of Section; I 
and C of this Bylaw lies with the Permitting Authority. 

i 

B. Stormwater Management Permits and Connection and Discharge Permits. The Permitting Authority si j 
the authority to require and to issue Stormwater Management Permits and/or Connection and Dischar^; 
Permits for projects subject to Section 5 that meet the requirements of this Bylaw and are not exemptej 
pursuant to Section 6. Any such Permit requirements shall be defined and included as part of any Stoi | 
Regulations promulgated as a result of this Bylaw. The Permitting Authority shall by regulation establ 

36 



collect Permit Application fees, Inspection fees, and in special cases, consultant fees for review of 
applications. Subsection 7B shall take effect on July 1, 2009. 

C. Delegation of Authority. The Permitting Authority may choose to delegate, in writing, his/her authority, in 
whole or in part, to a qualified representative (s), except as provided herein. 

D. Stormwater Regulations. The Permitting Authority may adopt, and periodically amend, rules and regulations 
relating to the terms, conditions, definitions, enforcement, procedures, delegation of authority, and 
administration of this Stormwater Management Bylaw relating to management and operation of the MS4. 

E. Project Categories. The Permitting Authority should by regulation establish categories of projects ranging 
from "minor" to "major" based on project size, scope, nature, or location. Project application requirements 
and submittals, fees, and criteria for permit issuance should be scaled appropriately based on project category. 

F. Stormwater Management Standards. For execution of the provisions of this Bylaw, the Permitting Authority 
will utilize the policy, criteria and information, including specifications and standards, of the latest editions of 
the Massachusetts Stormwater Management Standards and Technical Handbooks, or approved local 
equivalents. The Standards may be updated and expanded periodically, based on improvements in 
engineering, science, monitoring, and local maintenance experience. Unless specifically altered in the 
Stormwater Regulations, stormwater management practices that are designed, constructed, and maintained in 
accordance with these design and sizing criteria will be presumed to be protective of Massachusetts water 
quality standards. 

G. Action by the Permitting Authority. The Permitting Authority shall, within 30 days of the date of receipt of a 
completed application: 

a. Approve the Permit Application upon finding that the proposed plan will protect water resources and 
meets the objectives and requirements of this Bylaw; 

b. Approve the Permit Application with conditions, modifications or restrictions that are required to 
ensure that the project will protect water resources and meets the objectives and requirements of this 
Bylaw; or 

c. Disapprove the Permit Application if the proposed plan will not protect water resources or fails to 
meet the objectives and requirements of this Bylaw. 

H. Stormwater "Buy-Out". The Permitting Authority may allow the applicant to contribute to the construction of 
a public or shared stormwater facility in lieu of an onsite stormwater facility where it has been demonstrated 
that there is not sufficient space for onsite stormwater best management practices. 

I. Stormwater Utility. The Permitting Authority may recommend to Town Meeting the formation of a 

Stormwater Utility, pursuant to M.G.L. c. 83, § 16 and c. 40, § 1 A, as a special assessment district to generate 
funding specifically for stormwater management. Users within the district would pay a stormwater fee, and 
the revenue thus generated would directly support the maintenance and upgrade of the existing Municipal 
Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4); development of drainage plans, flood control measures, and water- 
quality programs; administrative costs; and construction of major capital improvements. This authority may 
not be delegated. 

CTION 8. LOW IMPACT DEVELOPMENT AND BETTER SITE DESIGN 

i use of non-structural LED Management practices and Better Site Design are encouraged to minimize reliance on 
icrural management measures. The use of Better Site Design and/or LID Management Practices may, if approved 
the Permitting Authority, also allow for a reduction in the treatment volume, a reduction of applicable fees 

37 



associated with the project, or other incentive approved by the Permitting Authority. 

SECTION 9. PROCEDURES 

Permit procedures and requirements shall be defined and included in as part of any rules and regulations promif 
pursuant to Section 7 of this Bylaw. 

SECTION 10. ENFORCEMENT 

A. The Permitting Authority or its designee(s) shall enforce this Bylaw and the regulations, orders, violati< 
notices, and enforcement orders issued pursuant thereto, and may pursue all civil and criminal remediei 
such violations. This Section shall take effect on July 1, 2009. 

1 . Civil Relief. If a person violates the provisions of this Bylaw, regulations, permit, notice, or on 
issued there under, the Permitting Authority may seek injunctive relief in a court of competent 
jurisdiction restraining the person from activities which would create further violations or comp 
the person to perform abatement and/or remediation of the violation. 

2. Orders. The Permitting Authority may issue a written order to enforce provisions of this Bylaw 
regulations there under, and any permits issued under this Bylaw, which may include, where 
appropriate: 

a) elimination of illicit connections or discharges to the MS4 or Waters of the Commonv 

b) requirement for the performance of monitoring, analyses, and reporting; 

c) abatement and remediation of stormwater pollution or contamination hazards, and res' 
of any affected property or impacts to water bodies; 

d) requirement to cease the land-disturbing activity until there is compliance with the By 
and provisions of the construction phase and post-construction phase stormwater 
management permits; 

e) maintenance of erosion and sediment control measures or installation of new such me 
and 

f) remediation of erosion and sedimentation resulting directly or indirectly from the land 
disturbing activity. 

3. Said order shall further advise that, should the violator or property owner fail to abate or perfor 
remediation within the specified deadline, the town may, at its option, undertake such work, am 
property owner shall reimburse the town's expenses. 

4. Within thirty (30) days after completing all measures necessary to abate the violation or to perf 
remediation, the violator and the property owner shall be notified of the costs incurred by the tc 
including administrative costs. The violator or property owner may file a written protest object 
the amount or basis of costs with the Permitting Authority within thirty (30) days of receipt oft 
notification of the costs incurred. If the amount due is not received by the expiration of the tinv 
which to file a protest or within thirty (30) days following a decision of the Permitting Authorit I 
affirming or reducing the costs, or from a final decision of a court of competent jurisdiction, the 
shall become a special assessment against the property owner and shall constitute a lien on the ( 
property for the amount of said costs. Interest shall begin to accrue on any unpaid costs at the 
statutory rate, as provided in G.L. Ch. 59, §.57, after the thirty-first day following the day on w 
the costs were due. 



38 



B. Any person who violates any provision of this Bylaw or of any regulation, order or permit issued there under 
may be punished by a fine of not more than $200. Each day or part thereof that such violation occurs or 
continues shall constitute a separate offense. 

C. As an alternative to criminal prosecution or civil action, the Town may elect to utilize the non-criminal 
disposition procedure set forth in G.L. Ch. 40 §. 2 ID and Ch. XVII § 4, subsection B of the General Bylaws 
of the Town of Ipswich, in which case the Permitting Authority shall be the enforcing person. The penalty for 
the 1st violation shall be $50. The penalty for the 2nd violation shall be $100. The penalty for the 3rd and 
subsequent violations shall be $200. Each day or part thereof that such violation occurs or continues shall 
constitute a separate offense. 

D. To the extent permitted by State law, or if authorized by the owner or another party in control of the project, 
the Permitting Authority or its designee(s) may enter upon privately owned property for the purpose of 
performing duties under this Bylaw and regulations and may make or cause to be made such examinations, 
surveys or sampling as it deems reasonably necessary. 

! E. The decisions or orders of the Permitting Authority shall be final. Further relief shall be to a court of 
competent jurisdiction. 

F. The remedies listed in this Bylaw are not exclusive of any other remedies available under any applicable 
federal, State or local law. 

XTION 11. EFFECTIVE DATE 

cept as provided herein, this Bylaw takes effect upon enactment. 

ICTION 12. SEVERABILITY 

my provision, paragraph, sentence, or clause of this Bylaw shall be held invalid for any reason, all other 
wisions shall continue in full force and effect. 



ITICLE 9 HAZARDOUS AND TOXIC MATERIALS REGULATION 

i motion of Mr. Brian Hone, duly seconded, it was 
)TED UNANIMOUSLY to 

end the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich as follows: 

Amend "V. USE REGULATIONS . D." by deleting paragraphs 2. through 6. in their entirety; 

Amend "IX. SPECIAL REGULATIONS ." by adding a new subsection "N. Requirements for Uses 
Involving Hazardous and Toxic Materials," said section to read as follows: 

i 

1 . Requirements for Uses involving Hazardous and Toxic Materials 
'\ Purpose 



39 



The purpose of this subsection is to minimize community exposure to hazardous and toxic materials and 
provide easily accessible information to the public, emergency response personnel, fire department and other 
Town officials concerning such materials which are being used, stored or managed by any local persons or 
business. It is also the intent of this Bylaw to protect, preserve and maintain the existing and potential 
groundwater recharge areas and surface drinking water supplies within the Town from contamination by 
hazardous and toxic materials. 

2. Definitions 

The following terms used in this section are defined in SECTION III. of the zoning Bylaw, within the definitic 
of Hazardous and Toxic Materials: hazardous wastes, hazardous materials, explosives, flammable and 
combustible liquids, flammable solids, and flammable gasses. 

For the purpose of this subsection, "NFPA 704" means section 704 of the National Fire Protection Associatior \ 
National Fire Code, as amended, which establishes an industry standard for the identification and storage of 
materials that create a fire hazard. 

3. Reporting 

a. Any use permitted by this zoning Bylaw which: 

I. processes, treats, and/or stores hazardous and toxic materials, including hazardous wastes, 
explosives, flammable and combustible liquids, flammable solids and flammable gasses, in 
quantities totaling more than fifty (50) gallons liquid volume or two hundred and fifty (250) pound 
dry weight; or 

II. processes, treats, and/or stores extremely hazardous materials that are included on The List of 

Extremely Hazardous Substances and their Threshold Planning Quantities (Federal Regulation 40 
CFR Part 355, Appendices A and B) in quantities that equal or exceed the Reportable Quantity 
established by that list; 

III. shall report and submit hazardous and toxic material inventory information with the Ipswich Fire 
Department. The inventory information requirements shall include, but not be limited to, the 
material's common or product name, chemical name, storage location, storage method, and 
maximum daily amount. For substances which are classified as hazardous wastes, the hazardous 
waste number and waste identification will substitute for the product and chemical names. 

b. Reporting required by this provision shall be initially submitted to the Ipswich Fire Department within 
ninety (90) days of the effective date of this Bylaw and annually thereafter during the month of Januar 

c. Any use which has not previously been reported in accordance with subsection 3. a. shall, once it 
achieves the threshold reporting requirement, be registered within thirty (30) days. 

d. In addition to reporting, owners or operators of any use registered in accordance with this subsection 
shall maintain on the premises an inventory, reconciled on a quarterly basis, of purchase, use, sale and 
disposal of hazardous materials. 

e. Upon the request of the Fire Department or the Ipswich Board of Health, owners or operators shall 
produce the latest reconciled inventory within one (1) business day. 



40 



Any use which processes, treats, and/or stores hazardous and toxic materials as described in subsection 
3. a. above shall also comply with the provisions of NFPA 704, as amended. 

The provisions of subsections 3. a. through 3.e. are not intended to contradict, replace, or invalidate 
conditions set by any Town Special Permit Granting Authority or any State or Federal regulations 
relating to the use, storage, or monitoring of hazardous materials. 

Special Permit 

Any use permitted by this zoning Bylaw which: 

(i) processes, treats, and/or stores hazardous and toxic materials, including hazardous wastes, 
explosives, flammable and combustible liquids, flammable solids and flammable gasses, in 
quantities totaling more than two hundred (200) gallons liquid volume or one thousand (1,000) 
pounds dry weight; or 

(ii) processes, treats, and/or stores extremely hazardous materials that are included on The List of 
Extremely Hazardous Substances and their Threshold Planning Quantities (Federal Regulation 
40 CFR Part 355, Appendices A and B) in quantities that equal or exceed the Threshold 
Planning Quantity established by that list; 

shall be allowed only by special permit from the Planning Board. 

In addition to the criteria for Special Permit defined in subsection IX. J. 2. of this zoning Bylaw, the 
Planning Board may issue a special permit only upon finding that the proposed use shall in no way 
adversely affect the existing or potential quality or quantity of water, and that adequate safeguards have 
been taken to minimize public exposure to hazardous materials and to reduce the risk of fire hazard. 

The provisions of subsection 3. above shall remain applicable to storage of hazardous materials 
approved by special permit. The Planning Board may require additional reporting or monitoring 
restrictions as a condition of special permit approval. 

Any proposed processing, treatment and/or storage of hazardous materials within a Water Supply 
Protection District which was denied a special permit pursuant to subsection IX. C. of this zoning Bylaw 
is ineligible to obtain a special permit under the provisions of this subsection IX.N. 

Water Supply Protection Districts 

is subsection is intended to complement subsection DC.C. Water Supply Protection Districts of this zoning 
law, which restricts all use of certain hazardous materials in specified overlay districts. Establishments that 
>cess, treat, and/or store hazardous materials in Water Supply Protection Districts must satisfy the provisions 
IX.C. before reporting prescribed in sub- section 3. above will be permitted. 

Exclusions 

e provisions of this subsection IX.N shall not apply to any use which: 

processes, treats, and/or stores hazardous materials, hazardous wastes, explosives, flammable and 
combustible liquids, flammable solids and flammable gasses, in quantities totaling fifty (50) gallons 
liquid volume or less, or two hundred fifty (250) pounds dry weight or less. 



41 



stores fuel oil or propane fuel in conformance with Massachusetts Fire Prevention Regulations and 
regulations of the Ipswich Board of Health for the sole purpose of heating buildings located on the site 
or to supply an emergency generator. 






c. stores or distributes propane, fuel oil, gasoline, and/or diesel fuel, provided that said use conforms to all 
other applicable local, state, and federal regulations. 

d. requires a special permit under subsection IX.C. of this zoning Bylaw. 

7. Regulations and Fees 

The Ipswich Fire Department may adopt reasonable rules and regulations and administrative fees for the 
reporting of hazardous and toxic materials pursuant to this subsection.". 



ARTICLE 10 GREEN SPACE PRESERVATION DEVELOPMENT 



i 



On motion of Mr. Timothy Purinton, duly seconded, it was 
VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to 

(1) amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich as follows: 

a) amend "Section IV. ZONING DISTRICTS " as follows: 

i. revise "A. Type of Districts" by adding "15. Green Space Preservation District"; and 

ii. revise "B. Intent of Districts" by adding the following: "12. The Green Space Preservation 

Development District is an overlay district intended to expand the Town's economic base by allowing 
limited non-residential uses on certain large properties in the RRA and RRC Districts. This overlay 
district preserves the allowed uses of the underlying districts while allowing specified non-residential 
uses if designed to protect the Town's natural features, rural character and vistas, preserve open space, 
and provide an alternative to subdivision of large parcels for residences;" and 

b) amend "IX. SPECIAL REGULATIONS " as follows: 

a. revise subsection "H.2.1" by deleting the word "biotechnological" from the first sentence; and 

b. by adding a new subsection "O. Green Space Preservation Development 
(GSPD)", said subsection to read as follows: 

"O. Green Space Preservation Development (GSPD) 

1. Purpose 

The purpose of this subsection is to: 

a. expand the Town's economic base by providing opportunities for appropriately sited and designed 
non-residential uses; 

42 



b. encourage the preservation and appropriate development of certain large properties in the RRA and 
RRC District; 

c. encourage the efficient use of such land in harmony with the natural features of the RRA and RRC 
District; 

d. protect the rural character and vistas of the Town's roads, especially its main corridors; 

e. provide an alternative to the subdivision of a large tract for residences; 

f. preserve open space for conservation or recreation use; and 

g. protect natural features which are important to the character of the town. 

Green Space Preservation Development District 

achieve the above purpose, this subsection establishes the Green Space Preservation Development District 
SPDD). The GSPDD is an overlay district, superimposed on the following parcels located in the Rural 
sidence A and Rural Residence C Districts, as shown on the official zoning map for the Town of Ipswich: 
sessor's Map 20B, Lot 30A; Assessor's Map 20B, Lot 31; and Assessor's Map 21, Lot 28. Within this 
trict all of the requirements of the underlying zoning district(s) continue to apply. The following uses shall be 
Dwed by special permit and site plan approval from the Planning Board, subject to the standards described in 
>sections 3 through 9: 

a. Miscellaneous professional and business offices and services; 

b. Research offices or establishments devoted to research and development activities; 

c. the processing of products arising out of, or substantially similar to, the research and development 
activities of a research office or establishment on the same lot; provided, however, that the Board 
determines, upon consultation with the Board of Health and the Water Commissioners, that said 
processing use is not detrimental to the health, safety, and welfare of the community. 



Density Standards 

a. Floor Area of Development : For the purposes of determining the total new floor area which 
may be developed on the lot, the applicant may construct new floor area in the development 
such that the total resulting floor area does not exceed the product of 3,000 square feet times 
the number of dwelling units which could be developed under application of single-family 
zoning requirements under the "Town of Ipswich Rules and Regulations Governing the 
Subdivision of Land" and in accordance with Sections VI., I.X.A. and LX.I. of this zoning 
Bylaw. The Applicant shall submit a "Yield Plan" which indicates the maximum number of 
lots achievable under a layout which generally complies with the 'Town of Ipswich Rules 
and Regulations Governing the Subdivision of Land, without altering any land areas in which 
such activity would be precluded by normal application of state and town laws and 
regulations governing wetlands and riverfront areas, or by the existence of floodplain areas. 
In unsewered areas, the Applicant shall provide evidence acceptable to the Planning Board 
that individual on-site wastewater treatment and disposal systems may be permitted and 
constructed to serve all the lots proposed under the "Yield Plan" as submitted. This evidence 
shall include a demonstration of suitable soil and groundwater conditions through 
representative sampling and testing of the buildable areas of the site by means and methods 
approved by the Board of Health and shall at a minimum consist of one determination of soil 
permeability and one observation of maximum ground water elevation per one acre of 
otherwise buildable land, such tests being distributed with reasonable uniformity over the 
site. 



43 



Additional Floor Space: If the proposed use(s) allowed in a GSPDD pursuant to 2. above 
provides more open space than is required by 5.c. of this subsection, then the new floor area 
to be developed on the lot may be increased by ten percent (10%) for every five percent (5% 
of additional satisfactory open space provided. 






c. Maximum Density: The total allowable floor area obtained through the application of the 
formulae described in sub-paragraphs a. and b. above, shall not exceed ten percent (10%) of 
the area of the lot. 

4. Building Design Standards 

When constructing or renovating buildings associated with uses allowed in a GSPDD pursuant to 2. above, the 
Applicant is encouraged to use green design and construction techniques that reduce consumption of natural 
resources such as water and energy, improve the efficiency and longevity of building systems, and minimize 
negative impacts on the environment and public health. Applicants are also encouraged to choose building 
designs and materials that are attractive and which complement the natural landscape. 

5. Development Requirements 

a. Town Water: The development shall be served by a water system deemed adequate for fire 
protection and domestic use by the Water Commissioners and by the Fire Chief. 

b. Sanitary Sewer/Septic: The development shall be served by the Town's sanitary sewer system or b 
one or more on-site disposal systems conforming to the State Environmental Code, Title V and the 
regulations of the Board of Health. If, however, in the judgment of the Board, the topography and/ 
soil conditions are such that it would be more efficient to allow (i) a private central sanitary sewer 
system, notwithstanding the lot's location in a Water Supply District, and/or (ii) allow an 
underground common septic system or individual septic systems to be placed in the preserved opei 
space, this configuration may be permitted. Prior to making such judgment, the Planning Board 
shall seek the review and recommendations of the Board of Health, Department of Utilities, Board 
Water Commissioners, and the Conservation Commission. If a use is proposed within a portion of 
the GSPDD that is located within a Water Supply District and a private central sanitary sewer syst< 
is proposed, the Planning Board shall not approve a special permit under this subsection unless anc 
until said system shall have received a favorable recommendation from the Board of Water 
Commissioners. All systems are further subject to approval by the Board of Health and any other 
governmental authority having jurisdiction. 

c. Open Space Restriction: A minimum of fifty (50%) percent of the lot shall either be: 

(i) conveyed to the Town of Ipswich and accepted by it for open space use; 

(ii) conveyed to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as part of a state forest, park, or wildlife 

management area; 

(iii) conveyed to a non-profit corporation, the principal purpose of which is the conservation o 

open space, and made subject to a conservation restriction prepared in accordance with the 

provisions of Section 31 and 33, inclusive, of Chapter 184 of the General Laws of the 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts; 

44 



(iv) made subject to a conservation restriction prepared in accordance with the provisions of 

Section 31 and 33, inclusive, of Chapter 184 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts running in favor of either the Town or, upon the approval of the Planning Board, a 

non-profit corporation, the principal purpose of which is the conservation of open space. The 

conservation restriction shall provide that such land shall be kept, in perpetuity, in an open or 

natural state, in accordance with the above-noted sections of Chapter 184 of the General Laws. 

In designating the open space, the applicant shall apply the guidelines entitled CRITERIA FOR 
EVALUATING OPEN SPACE , adopted by the Planning Board and amended from time to time. 
At least a portion of the open space shall be available for use by the general public, unless the 
applicant demonstrates to the Planning Board's satisfaction why such access would be infeasible. 

d. Dimensional Regulations: 
(i) a minimum setback of one hundred (100) feet of naturally vegetated area shall be provided 
from all street lines and abutting lots. The required 100 foot buffer strip shall contain sufficient 
natural or landscape vegetation, i.e., dense evergreen over- and under-story, to effectively screen ( 
any development on the site that would otherwise be visible from the streets abutting the 
property. An entry drive, along with appropriate signage, may be permitted within the buffer 
strip. The Planning Board may increase by not more than twenty (20%) percent any buffer area 
requirement if, after site plan review by the Board, the Board deems such action to be reasonable 
and appropriate. 

(ii) the area developed for permitted uses, including buildings, parking, outdoor recreational 
structures, and areas paved for vehicular use, shall not exceed thirty percent (30%) of the total 
area of the lot. Walking or bicycle trails shall not be counted in the calculation of the (30%) 
limitation. 

(iii) the development shall be subject to design review and site plan review in accordance with 
the provisions of Section IX.K. and Section X. of this Bylaw, respectively, 
(iv) newly constructed buildings in a GSPD shall be setback at least two hundred and fifty feet 
(250) from a public way. 

e. Further Subdivision : After issuance of a special permit and site plan approval for any use(s) allowed 
pursuant to 2. above, and establishment of the required open space for said uses, as a whole, the 
subject property may be subdivided into lots which may be less than twenty-five (25) acres in size 
and may be held in separate ownership, provided that each portion of the subdivided site remains 
subject to all of the applicable terms and conditions of (i) the special permit, and (ii) the site plan 
approval for the improvements on such portion of the site. 

f. Phasing: Phasing of the uses allowed within a GSPDD, as approved by the Planning Board, shall be 
permitted either pursuant to phasing described in the initial special permit application or in 
subsequent special permit or site plan review applications. The special permit and site plan approval 
shall not be deemed to have lapsed so long as the applicant shall have commenced use of the special 
permit or site plan approval in substantial accordance with the phasing time frames set forth in the 
special permit and site plan approval application. The Planning Board shall have the authority to 
require a performance bond or other similar mechanism if it determines that such a mechanism is 
necessary to ensure that the key components of the project are satisfactorily completed. 

: Special Permit Application Process 

1 special permit applications for a use(s) allowed in a GSPDD pursuant to 2. above shall be made and filed on 
I appropriate application form. For an application to be considered complete, it shall provide all information 

45 



required by the Rules and Regulations Governing Granting of Special Permits, available from the Department 
of Planning and Development, and by any regulations adopted in accordance with paragraph 10. below. 



. 



The special permit application shall also be accompanied by twenty (20) copies of a site development report, 
which shall summarize how the proposed use(s) satisfies the special permit criteria being considered by the 
Planning Board. The site development report should include, at minimum, an inventory of natural resource 
features, wildlife and their habitat; a general inventory of all existing buildings, structures and existing trails; 
detailed description of the proposed components of the development; a validated delineation of all wetlands am 
Riverfront areas on and within 100 feet of the site, and all buffer zones and subzones thereto on the site; and an 
outline of how the following issues and impacts will be addressed by the development: (a) pedestrian and 
vehicular access to the site; (b) public safety issues; (c) provision of landscaping/buffering; (d) protection of 
wildlife habitats; (e) provision of utilities; (f) open space and recreation; (g) water supply and drainage issues; j 
(h) layout and density of site development; (i) building design and materials, including exterior elevations of 
existing and proposed buildings; and (j) proposed nature of the commercial activity. To the extent possible, th< 
information provided in the report shall be shown in map form, accompanied by written narrative. 

7. Review Criteria 

In addition to applying the Special Permit general conditions described in XI. J. of this zoning Bylaw, and the i 
standards, requirements, or conditions set forth in this IX. I., the Board shall review the special permit 
application in accordance with the following criteria: (1) the proposed use(s) within the GSPDD, by its design 
and layout, succeeds in preserving open space for conservation and/or recreation purposes and protecting 
natural features of the land which are important to the character of the town, especially the vistas of the road(s 
upon which the GSPD takes its frontage; and (2) the use(s) proposed pursuant to this Section DC.O is 
compatible with any use on the property as of the date of the special permit application. 

8. Preliminary Review 

I 
Prior to submitting a special permit application to the Planning Board for a use(s) in a GSPDD, the applicant i : 
strongly encouraged to submit a preliminary concept plan for review by the Planning Board and a Developme 
Review Committee appointed by the Town Manager. The preliminary review shall provide an opportunity foi I 
the applicant to identify early in the process the preferences of the Planning Board and Review Committee 
relative to the development of the site. The Review Committee shall include the chairs of the Conservation 
Commission, Open Space Committee, Bay Circuit Trail Committee, and Historical Commission, or their 
designees; the Directors of the Town Departments of Utilities, Code Enforcement, Public Works, Public Safet 
and Planning & Development; a professional architect; a professional landscape architect; a professional civil 
engineer; and one or more residents from the neighborhood in which the use(s) is proposed. 

The preliminary concept plan should show: (a) the location, height, density, and architectural treatment of all 
proposed buildings; (b) the size, location and proposed use of the open space; (c) the location of all existing ai 
proposed parking areas and access roads within and without the GSPD; (d) the type and probable location oft 
proposed utilities; and (e) a delineation of any wetlands or other environmentally-sensitive land on the proper! 

9. Advisory Opinion 

Within ten days (10) of receipt of a special permit application for a use allowed in a GSPDD pursuant to 2. 
above, the Planning Board shall transmit copies of the application to the aforementioned Development Reviev 
Committee, which shall review the application and submit their recommendations to the Planning Board with 
forty-five (45) days of the referral of the application."; and 

(2) amend the Official Zoning Map of the Town of Ipswich by mapping the Green Space Preservation 
Development District as shown on the attached map, said district to include the following parcels: 

46 



Assessor's Map 

20B 

20B 

21 



Lot 

30A 
31 

28 



copy of the attached map is on file in the office of the Town Clerk and the Department of Planning & 
jvelopment. 



*TICLE 11 



GREEN BUILDING INCENTIVES 



l motion of Mr. James Manzi, duly seconded, it was 
)TED UNANIMOUSLY to 
lefinitely postpone this article. 



ITICLE 12 



MISCELLANEOUS CHANGES 



i motion of Mr. James Manzi, duly seconded, it was 
)TED UNANIMOUSLY to 

end the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich as follows: 

Amend "II. APPLICABILITY , B." by adding a sentence to the end of paragraph "5." to read as follows: 
le time period for reconstruction of structures to which the demolition delay has been applied by the Ipswich 
itorical Commission shall be extended by a time period equivalent to the length of the delay, up to a 
ximum of twelve (12) months, without requiring approval from the Zoning Board of Appeals.; and 

Amend "III. DEFINITIONS " as follows: revise the definition of "LOT AREA" by deleting, from the first 
itence, the words "open to public use"; and 

Amend "V. USE REGULATIONS " as follows: 

a) amend the "TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS" by: (i) adding, to the use "Assisted Living or Life 
Care Facility", under the column heading "PRINCIPAL USE, Commercial", the footnote "19"; (ii) 
deleting the footnote "7" applied to the use allowances for "Rest homes, convalescent home, or nursing 
homes for the elderly or infirm" and "Funeral establishment"; (iii) revising the use "Research offices or 
establishments devoted to research and development activities", under the column heading 
"PRINCIPAL USE, Wholesale, Transportation & Industrial", by changing "SBA 27 " to "— " for the 
RRA, RRB and IR Districts; (iv) add, under the column heading "ACCESSORY USE", the use 
"Research offices or establishments devoted to research and development activities", and add "SBA" 
under each district in that row; and (v) add, under the column heading "ACCESSORY USE", the use 
"Outdoor hydronic heaters", and add "SBA 28 " under each district in that row; 

b) amend "FOOTNOTES TO USE REGULATIONS" as follows: 



47 



1. revise footnote "4." by deleting the phrase "the access to the establishment shall be 
considered safe from a traffic viewpoint as determined by the Town Engineer;"; 

2. delete footnote "7." in its entirety, and substitute in lieu thereof the following: "7. 
Reserved."; 

3. For Footnote "19.", delete the word "RESERVED", and substitute in lieu thereof the 
following: "19. Residential units in an Assisted Living or Life Care Facility, regardless of 
whether they are single-family, two-family, or multi-family dwelling units, are subject to th 
same Inclusionary Housing Requirements that apply to multi-family residential 
developments, as described in Section IX.IJ.a. of this zoning Bylaw."; 






4. Add a new Footnote "27.", said footnote to read as follows: "27. Provided that the use is 
accessory to a principal use that is permitted in the same district in which the accessory use I 
proposed. The accessory use need not be located on the same parcel as the principal use."; 
and 

5. Add a new Footnote "28.", said footnote to read as follows: "28. Outdoor hydronic heater \ 
shall not receive special permit approval unless it is been demonstrated to the special perm 
granting authority (SPGA) that they have satisfied all of the specifications and installation 
requirements described in the State Department of Environmental Protection's regulation 3 
CMR 7.26(50). If an outdoor hydronic heater is proposed as part of a use requiring a speci 
permit or site plan approval from the Planning Board, then the special permit authority sha 
be the Planning Board, notwithstanding the SPGA designated in the Table of Uses. "; and j 

(4) Amend "VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS, FOOTNOTES TO TABLE OF 
DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS " as follows: 

a) amend "F. Requirements for Accessory Buildings and Structures" by adding to the end of the sixth 
sentence the following: ", and only upon a finding that: 

a. the proposed accessory structure satisfies the criteria for Special Permit as prescribed in Sectic 
XI.J.2., paragraphs a. and b. of this Bylaw; and 

b. the proposed accessory structure does not create a substantially greater burden for the Town o: 
neighborhood than would an accessory structure under 750 square feet in area or under 25 feei 
height. Considerations include: 

(1) Whether the traffic generation and/or parking needs associated with the 
proposed accessory structure would be detrimental to the surrounding 
neighborhood; 

(2) Whether the proposed accessory structure requires extension or alteration of 
existing utilities that would otherwise be adequate for a smaller accessory 
structure; 

(3) Whether the large size of the proposed accessory structure necessitates desig 
construction, or other physical features out of character for the district that cc i 
be avoided with a smaller accessory structure; and 

(4) Whether the design of the proposed accessory structure, in terms of materials 
proportions, height, architectural details and scale, is adequate to ensure that I 
large accessory structure preserves the character of the surrounding area and 
compatible with the architectural design style of the principal building on the 
site; and 



48 



(5) Whether the proposed accessory structure produces or exacerbates any other 
impact that the SPGA deems a detriment to public health, safety, and welfare 
which could be avoided with a smaller accessory structure; and 
C. the principal use to which the proposed structure will be accessory is permitted in the zoning 
district as a matter of right, as prescribed in Section V.D. TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS and 
the lot and principal structure conforms to all dimensional and density regulations of Section VI. 
of this zoning Bylaw. 

b) amend "G. Other General Dimensional and Density Requirements", paragraph "4." by deleting 
"seventy-five (75) feet," and by adding a comma after the word "respectively"; and 

) Amend "VII. OFF-STREET PARKING AND LOADING REGULATIONS as follows: Modify "B. 
rking Requirements, Table of Minimum Parking Requirements", Use "1 . Residence" by adding an asterisk 
er the required parking space requirement of "One and a half (1-/4) spaces per dwelling unit.", said asterisk to 
.d as follows: "*For parking associated with dwelling units created pursuant to Section DC.J. (Accessory 
lartments) of this zoning Bylaw, the Zoning Board of Appeals may allow, as condition of it special permit 
)roval, only one space per accessory apartment."; and 

Amend "DC. SPECIAL REGULATIONS , J. Accessory Apartment" as follows: 

modify paragraph "2.k.", by deleting the words "in-law" from both sentences in the paragraph.; (b) amend 
0" by deleting from the first sentence the words "the principal dwelling unit on the premises as their primary 
idence" and substituting in lieu thereof "either the principal dwelling or the accessory apartment on the 
mises as their primary year-round residence or their sole seasonal residence"; and (c) add to "2." a new 
agraph "q.", said paragraph to read as follows: "q. The creation of an accessory apartment within a principal 
gle-family residence must be done so that the accessory apartment either shares a common floor-ceiling 
embly with the principal dwelling or a common wall connector as defined in Section III. of this zoning 
law."; 



ITICLE 13 DISPOSITION OF PARCELS 

motion of Ms. Ingrid Miles, duly seconded, it was 
)TED UNANIMOUSLY to 

accept a parcel of land located in the Cross Banks, consisting of approximately 11.1 acres and further 
ntified as Lot 17 on Assessor's Map 15 A, as a gift of land; 

convey a parcel of land located at Rear Argilla Road, consisting of approximately 3.4 acres and further 
ntified as Lot 10 on Assessor's Map 64, to the Essex County Greenbelt Association; 

:ransfer care, custody and control of a parcel of land located at 90 Paradise Road, consisting of approximately 
acres and further identified as Lot 3 on Assessor's Map 13, to the Conservation Commission; 

xansfer care, custody and control of a parcel of land located on High Street, consisting of approximately 2.4 
es and further identified as Lot 6 on Assessor's Map 20C, to the Water Commissioners/Utilities Department; 

nriCLE 14 TAX INCREMENT FINANCING - MERCURY BREWING 



49 



On motion of Mr. Patrick McNally, duly seconded, it was 
VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to 

1) approve the Project Certification Application, submitted by Mercury Brewing Inc. on September 18, 2008, 
for a facility located within the Downtown Ipswich Economic Opportunity Area (EOA), at 2 Soffron Lane, 
further identified as Parcel 281 on Assessors Map 4 IB; and 

2) approve the form of the Tax Increment Financing Agreement between Mercury Brewing Inc. and the Tow 
of Ipswich, and the corresponding TIF plan; and 

3) confirm that the proposed project (a) is consistent with the goals of the Downtown Ipswich EOA and w 
benefit significantly from its development in said EOA; (b) will not overburden the Town's municipal service 
infrastructure, and utilities servicing the EOA; (c) will increase employment opportunities for residents ! 
Ipswich and the Cape Ann Economic Target Area, thereby reducing blight, economic depression, and relian . 
of public assistance; and (d) will be designated as a certified project for a term not to exceed six (6) years; and 

4) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take such actions as are necessary to obtain approval of the certifi! 
project application and to implement the tax increment financing plan. 



ARTICLE 15 SPECIAL ACT: FUNDING OF ACCRUED LIABILITY FOR POS 

EMPLOYMENT BENEFITS (GASB 45) 

i 

On motion of Ms. Elizabeth Kilcoyne, duly seconded, it was 
VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to 

authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the General Court for special legislation substantially in the 
following form (subject to clerical or editorial changes of form), and further to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to approve any additional amendments which are within the scope of the general public objectives 
this petition: 



AN ACT ESTABLISHING A POST EMPLOYMENT HEALTH INSURANCE LIABILITY FUND IN THE 
TOWN OF IPSWICH 



Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court assembled, and by the 
authority of the same as follows: 

I 

SECTION 1 . The town of Ipswich may appropriate funds in order to offset the anticipated cost of health 
insurance contributions for retired employees, their spouses and eligible dependents and the surviving spouse 
and eligible dependents of deceased retirees. This amount shall be credited to a special fund to be known as tl 
Post Employment Health Insurance Liability Fund. The fund shall be under the supervision and management . 
the Town Manager and under the custody of the Town Treasurer. The Town Treasurer may deposit the proce j» 
in national banks or invest the proceeds by deposit in savings banks, cooperative banks, or trust companies 
organized under the laws of the Commonwealth or in federal savings and loan associations situated in the 
Commonwealth or invest the funds in "Securities that are legal for the investment of funds of savings banks 
under the laws of the Commonwealth." Any interest or other income earned by the fund shall be added to an 
become part of the fund. Amounts may be appropriated to the fund by any town meeting by a majority vote n 
to exceed the total liability developed by an actuarial study. Authorized disbursements shall be made from th< 

50 



id in payment of contributions and premiums for the benefit of retirees and their eligible dependents and 
•viving spouses and for costs associated with conducting the actuarial study without further appropriation, 
e Town Manager may employ any qualified bank, trust company, corporation, firm or person for advice on 
investment of the fund and or to prepare an actuarial study and may pay for this advice or service from this 
id. 

CTION 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 



UTICLE 16 



VEHICLE REPLACEMENT PROGRAM 



motion of Mr. Charles Surpitski, duly seconded, it was 
►TED UNANIMOUSLY to 
definitely postpone this article. 



TICLE 17 



CEMETERY AND PARKS VEHICLE PURCHASE 



motion of Mr. James Foley, duly seconded, it was 
;sed to 

horize the Board of Cemetery and Parks to purchase a new truck costing $52,000 by utilizing the "Sale of 
s Trust Fund". 



TICLE 18 



RECONSIDERATION 



motion of Ms. Ingrid Miles, duly seconded, it was 
»TED UNANIMOUSLY to 

efinitely postpone this article. 

eting adjourned at 9:53 p.m. on October 20, 2008. 

pectfully submitted, 

lela Z. Carakatsane, CMMC, CMC 
vn Clerk 



51 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Ingrid F. Miles, Chair 

Two thousand eight has been a year of mindfulness regarding moving towards goals previously set by the Bo* 
of Selectmen including ongoing review of Ipswich's financial, organizational and conservation efficiencies. 
Efforts that begin in 2007 were carried forward into 2008 with ongoing meetings with the chairs of the 
neighboring towns to review common needs and areas for potential savings. Areas of note included 
regionalization of waste management, stormwater management, and a forum regarding GIC (health insurance] 
including representatives from the Essex Retirement Board and Boston Benefit Partners. It is our hope to 
continue such collaboration to maximize the services provided to our citizenry at minimum of cost to the 
taxpayers in these areas noted. 

Looking back, we see Board of Selectmen agendas filled with budgetary discussions at the beginning of the 
calendar year not unlike prior years. One major difference this year is that the timeline has been extended 
forward with Annual Town Meeting now being held in May vs. April and allowance for better information 
coming from the Commonwealth regarding local aid to Ipswich in a more supportive timeline. As you may 
recall this was a warrant article on last year's Annual Town Meeting which passed favorably resulting in this 
year's May meeting. 

In addition to the budget review process going forward in January, the Board of Selectmen dealt with the mat 
of 40B project known as Powderhouse Village, 48 units of rental housing on County Road proposed by the 
North Shore YMCA. Though the Board did not favor the overall design nor density of the project on 2 acres 
land that is a leading corridor into the community, the Selectmen did vote favorably to support affordable 
housing in adherence with the Town's vision statement. Please recognize that many meetings with all parties 
involved took place with the hopes for redesign and lower density prior to this vote of support. 

During February, the Board met with Randy Dickerson of the Federal Railroad Administration regarding quii 
zone status implications for the Town of Ipswich. Upon hearing the possible costs to the Town for upgrading 
safety measures at the Topsfield Road RR crossing and recognizing the challenges of providing a balanced 
budget, the Board chose to not take such measures not fully realizing what was yet to come which will be 
covered later in my review of 2008. 









Moving forward into March, I am proud to also note the stance Ipswich citizenry have taken regarding waste 
management, more specifically recycling, and energy conservation. The Recycling Committee should feel 
proud of its efforts as recycling efforts increased throughout the community and dollars saved in tipping fees, 
request that you read their committee report for details of their efforts and accomplishments. Without questk 
Ipswich is at the forefront of communities making the effort to 'go green' not only in its recycling efforts but 
also in terms of energy conservation and alternative energy sources. Citizens voted to support the wind turbi 
project and capitalize on funding programs for this effort. Without question, we must applaud the efforts of 
Ipswich Utilities led by Tim Henry and Electric Light Subcommittee member, James Engel, for their 
steadfastness in presenting information not only to the Board of Selectmen for their critical review, but also t 
the Finance Committee, School Committee and ultimately to the Town of Ipswich citizenry in its final 
comprehensive presentation to the Annual Town Meeting - not an easy task - which resulted in a favorable \ 
by Town Meeting to move forward with this project. I am happy to report this project is currently underway. 
Please check your monthly utility bills for conservation updates as well. 

The budgetary discussions moved forward from January through to bean counting in early April with great 
concern for balancing the budget and staying within Prop 2 Vi guidelines. After cutting expenses, the Board 
reviewed ways in which to increase revenue for the town including barn inspection fees, beach sticker fee 
increase and parking lot fees. Democracy is alive and well in Ipswich as evidenced by the participation by 
Ipswich citizenry at the budget hearings with much debate. Final outcome: beach Sticker fees were increase 

52 



fective July 1, 2008 to $20/sticker and the parking lot fee of $2/day was voted down. At that time the Board 
as seeking to increase revenues by $8000 to present a balanced budget at Annual Town Meeting last year; this 
ems to be a mild challenge given the current economic climate where the Town Manager, Bob Markel, must 
entify to the current Board how to reduce the current budget in excess of $100,000 on the municipal side 
one. As a point of information, the municipal share of the budget is less than 40% of the overall budget with 
e remainder of 60%+ accounting for the school budget. 

fter Town Meeting elections in May, the Board of Selectmen had a new member among its ranks with Charlie 
irpitski replacing Ed Rauscher. I trust that I probably speak for the other members of the Board in noting that 
1 through his many terms of being Selectmen had an institutional knowledge that is missed at the Selectmen 
;etings but also recognize Charlie stepping up to the plate on many committees that Ed served on. 
i with every town election, committee appointments were made but this year rather than reappointing 
Mnbers for a one year term, we streamlined the process so that committee members serve for 3 year terms. 
e Town of Ipswich is fortunate to have so many of its citizenry willing to serve on the scores of committees 
it assist the elected officials as well as the Town Manager and its Directors in doing Town business. Thank 
u to each of you named on a committee roster noted in this annual report. 

e Old Town Hall sale to EMC was to result in an entertainment center. The Purchase and Sale Agreement 
ween the town and EMC included right of first refusal by the town in the event of sale of the property by 
1C was proposed which came before the Board as to whether to repurchase the property. The Board learned 
t another party is seeking to continue with the initial vision of a movie theater and complementary businesses 
i efforts are still underway in keeping with this vision; the Board supports that effort going forward, 
course as has been the case for the past 5 years, Utilities Director, Tim Henry, came before the Board with 
ommended sewer rate and electric rate increases which were approved by this Board. As noted in the prior 
mal report, conservation measures though supportive of the environment are contradictory in reducing costs 
Droviding said services. The norms of 'economies of scale' do not apply as fixed operating expenses are 
set by fewer revenues. 

; decision to not press forward with grade crossing safety measures in February came to haunt the Board 
ne July with the 'quiet zone' status no longer in place and train horns blowing at each and every train 
ssing times 23 trains/day. Needless to say, the residents came to Selectmen meetings upset, frustrated and 
king answers to endless questions. A citizen action group came before the Board on many occasions as 
ted as the summer month's heat of July and August. In each challenge is the opportunity to learn and meet 
challenge with growth and so we did as a community. On this year's warrant, I am happy to report that 
re will be an article regarding grade crossing safety measures at a fraction of the original costs. This is a 
ction of invaluable citizen participation, Town Manager, DPW Director, and Board of Selectmen 
ticipation as well as interaction with our local, state and federal governmental agencies and officials. I 
not thank our rookie Selectman, Charlie Surpitski, enough for his leading the Grade Crossing Committee (on 
ich I serve as well) to bring forward this article to you at May 2009 Annual Town Meeting. The efforts of 
rley, Berry, Monica Joyce, David Moorad, Janet Foote, Kathy O'Brien, and Lisa Cashman are to be 
lmended for their steadfast commitment to a quality of life that includes public health and safety for all. 

■ economic downturn resulting in a national bail-out plan during the fall '08 found the Board re-evaluating 
lg forward and preparing for the upcoming fiscal year with conservatism and more financial review that may 
lire action. The Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and School Committee have met collectively to 
ew the Town's financial health and have taken action to reduce expenditures in the current year. It became 
arent that going forward would result in a zero increase budget which is being presented to you at the May 
meeting for you consideration. Coincidentally, ways to cut expenses were examined including whether to 
the GIC at the State level. Meetings were held; a grant for expert actuarial review was applied for and 
ived from the Essex Retirement Board and vote taken whether to join the GIC. Attending the forum where 
ton Benefit Partners and Essex Retirement Board Director presented information about the GIC, I learned 

53 






that to gain benefit of membership requires 20% savings which supported the vote to not join at this time 
because savings were under 20%. This opportunity is still being explored as membership in the health 
programs increase with more spouses joining as a result of layoffs et al. Our intent is to use the threat of joinii 
GIC in negotiations with MIIA, our current provider of health services. 

Other areas of concern that are being monitored closely is the category of 'Snow and Ice' expenses; Decembe 
saw several severe snowstorms and with the cost of salt skyrocketing, questions arose as to how to provide 
public safety on the roadways with a minimum of expense. Routine reporting and adopting policy identifying 
primary roads plowing efforts to bare pavement and secondary roads less so still with an eye to ensuring publi 
safety. These may not be viewed as favorable approaches to cost containment but necessary in light of curren 
economic conditions. Throughout the year, DPW has been a constant presenter of road management 
recommendations including sidewalks and recreational paths as well. Most importantly, the need to ensure 
public safety is at the forefront of all policies in place as it relates to road management. 
Regarding Annual Town Meeting held in May, 2008, monies were reprogrammed from the Riverwalk Bond t , 
support efforts at the Riverwalk entrance on South Main Street. The wind turbine article passed and has been 
already noted herein. Of great note is the support at the polls for the general override for the Schools in the 
amount of $1.4 million dollars. 



October, 2008 Town Meeting warrant articles of note that met with voter approval included funding of safety 
improvements at MBTA grade crossings, tax increment financing for Mercury Brewing, purchase of a vehiclt 
for Cemetery and Parks, and stormwater bylaw. The funding of safety improvements at grade crossings was 
consulting and recommendations from that effort will be reported at the Annual Town Meeting in May, 2009 
Mercury Brewing will be expanding and moving their facility to include a Brew Pub in the Brownville Squar 
area with assistance from the tax increment financing. Stormwater By-Law, (unfunded mandate from the 
Federal Government) is now in Phase II of implementation and included in the Town's By-Laws within DPV 
oversight currently. 

Last, but not least, in terms of activities before this Board was the controversial disbanding of the Shellfish 
Advisory Board as it was dysfunctional for some time upon our involvement. This disbanding gave rise to a 
new Shellfish Advisory Board Sub-Committee led by fellow Selectmen, Elizabeth Kilcoyne and Charlie 
Surpitski with new membership. The disbanding occurred as a result of shellfish grants requiring review and 
renewal of grants. A host of errors on both the part of the Town (BOS and Town Manager) regarding 
interpretation of Town and State regulations occurred coupled with the applicants' failure to comply with 
reporting requirements for shellfish grants. All in all, the outcome 1 believe is favorable with the new 
membership and leadership with review of rules and regulations at the forefront and policy concerning prival 
and public shellfish grants to follow. Thank you to the new members of the Shellfish Advisory Board Sub- 
Committee under the leadership of Selectmen Kilcoyne and Surpitski. 

The Board of Selectmen Chair drafted a Code of Ethics for Selectmen which have been adopted by the Boan j 
drawing from surrounding town's data for input. This was a function of the annual retreat held that included 
Role of Selectmen and Responsibilities last August. A Committee Handbook for reference by Chairs of 
Committees is in the final stages of editing for adoption as well. 

Town employee retirements occurred again this year, and we thank these employees for their expertise, 
dedication and commitment to Ipswich. Employee retirements find new employees stepping forward taking 
their place and we wish them well. At the helm of town management is Town Manager, Bob Markel, who 
continues in his role which assures continuity of goals and direction set forth; please find them noted at the e: 
of this annual report. 

It has been a pleasure to work with all the members of the Board of Selectmen including Vice Chair, Jim Fol 
Pat McNally, Elizabeth Kilcoyne and Charlie Surpitski and our former Selectman Ed Rauscher. Working 

54 



gether has been a positive, respectful, and productive experience in policymaking for our outstanding 
immunity. 

hank the residents of Ipswich for the opportunity to serve as a member of the Board of Selectmen and to my 
lleagues to serve at its Chair this past year. 



******** 



NANCE COMMITTEE 

)bert White, Chair 

ie mission of the town of Ipswich is to provide an exceptional quality of life for its citizens. We believe this is 
lieved by providing strong schools, safe streets, quality human services and a well-maintained town 
'restructure. With town revenues growing by a modest 2.6% this year, both the school and municipal budgets 
:re faced with considerable challenges and significant choices. 

ith a slowing of the economy, new real estate growth in Ipswich has begun to slow, mirroring the state trend, 
is is significant because Town's revenue is delivered through two main sources; local taxes and fees, which 
tresents 85% of our annual revenue and state revenue disbursements, which provide the remaining 15% of 
r revenues. Therefore, as the economy slows so too does our ability to increase operating and capital revenue. 

is trend towards modest budget increase has required the town to budget conservatively and conduct a 
nprehensive examination of all expenses in an effort to reduce costs wherever practical. While we fully 
)port this approach, the Finance Committee expects that future year's revenue growth will not keep pace with 
ff salaries, benefits, the demand for new and expanded services, and sustained capital spending. As such, 
se business examinations will likely be an annual requirement. 

spite our challenging financial situation and conservative budget approach, Ipswich continues to provide the 
vices you have come to rely upon while investing in infrastructure improvement and protecting our natural 
isures. This commitment to growth during financially precarious times enhances the daily experience of our 
idents while attracting both business and tourism, which will in turn support our revenue stream. To this end, 
Town has been awarded a grant from the Metropolitan Area Planning Council to revitalize the downtown 
a and historic North Green. Additionally, our Open Space and Green Initiatives have drawn tremendous 
•port from residents in their work to protect and preserve the beauty and resources of Ipswich. 

wich Public Schools continued to attract and retain residents by providing an inclusive, quality educational 
>erience for our children. While all academic measurements have flaws, the Finance Committee feels that 
Ipswich residents with or without students in the school system should have some means of identifying their 
ool districts' educational quality. In 2007, Ipswich High School experienced 88% of our children being 
epted into four and two year college programs upon graduation, while the Ipswich School district performed 
he top one-third in the state on the MCAS (a required state-wide exam). Additionally, Ipswich Athletic and 
{ s and Music programs continue to build upon past awards. 

: Finance Committee is grateful for the opportunity to work with the Board of Selectmen and School 
nmittee in serving the residents of Ipswich. This 2008 Finance Committee consists of: Daniel Clasby, 
ice Clements-Skelton, William Craft, Jamie Fay, Richard Howard, Raymond Morley, Michael Schaaf, 
rion Swan, Robert White and Clark Ziegler. 



55 



TOWN MANAGER 

Robert T. Market, PhD. 

The principal challenge for town officials in 2008 was to maintain quality services to residents and businesses 
while coping with the deepest economic downturn since the Great Depression. The revenue base for the town 
and the state eroded steadily in the last quarter of 2008, resulting in midyear cuts in state aid that was 
anticipated in the Fiscal 2009 budget. At the end of 2008, town revenues like the motor vehicle tax that are 
sensitive to the state of the economy were dropping rapidly. In addition, a snowy winter exacerbated budget 
problems causing a deficit in the snow and ice account nearly double the original budget. 

Town government cut back spending across the board in order to avoid a fiscal crisis with attendant layoffs ar ! 
service cuts. Efforts to improve efficiency and squeeze out unnecessary costs have been a high priority for thr 
Town Manager and Selectmen, but the economic downturn has underscored the importance. New initiatives i ' 
energy conservation and regional cooperation are underway. The Chair of the Board of Selectmen meets 
monthly with other Select Board chairs in the region. Some recent efforts include further regional ization of 
veterans' services, a fire chiefs' initiative to regionalize emergency dispatch operations and regionalization of' 
ambulance services. Energy conservation efforts include replacement of the old and drafty windows at Towr 
Hall, and in the coming fiscal year, changing out the inefficient heating systems at the Police Department and * 
Library. Other than large trucks, only fuel efficient and hybrid vehicles will be purchased for the Town fleet. 
The Electric Department continued its broad based effort to promote conservation of electricity by businesses 
and residents with a program of free energy audits and distribution of free, energy saving light bulbs. 



Through a gift from EBSCO Corporation, the Town benefited from the installation of a high speed fiber optic 
line connecting the thirteen most significant buildings. The old coaxial cable network broke down on a regul 
basis knocking out communications and disrupting the accounting system. 



! 



Among the accomplishments in 2008 were Town Meeting acceptance of a stormwater by-law and a major ne 
policy regarding road and street projects. The stormwater by-law begins a process that will take many years 
eventually will produce significant improvements in water quality in the Town's rivers, streams and ponds. 



, 



In 2008, the Selectmen developed a new street improvement program incorporating sidewalk improvements, 
permanent crosswalks and lanes for cyclists whenever street reconstruction occurs. The Department of Publi 
Works commissioned a study of pavement conditions on every street in Town, and a ten year program to 
upgrade pavement conditions was presented to the Selectmen. Also, an infrastructure coordinating committe | 
was created by the Town Manager to ensure that water and sewer projects done by the Utilities Department a 
properly coordinated with the street program of the DPW. 

The Federal Railroad Administration implemented Congress's mandate for safety improvements at grade 
crossings in 2008. In June, the FRA rejected the Town's request for a delay in making safety improvements, 
and MBTA commuter trains were ordered to sound horns at each of the five grade crossings in the town. Trwt 
disruption to residents living near the grade crossings was very serious. The town submitted a detailed plan f 
grade crossing safety improvements in August, and the quiet zone was restored. FRA rules require that safet; 
improvements on Topsfield Road and two other locations be completed by June 2010 in order to continue the 
quiet zone through town. 

2009 will mark the 375th anniversary of the founding of Ipswich. Planning for the 375th began in the spring 
2008. The celebration will culminate on August 9, 2009 with a parade and picnic at Town Hall and remarks 
from state and local public officials. 

56 



'ECIAL ASSISTANT TO THE TOWN MANAGER 

SST. PURCHASING DIRECTOR 

ISK MANAGEMENT/SAFETY COORDINATOR 

rah A. Stanton 

le Purchasing Office employee oversees and monitors all department procurements with the exception of the 
y to day expenditures of the Electric Department and School Department; puts out to bid expenditures in 
cess of $25,000 for goods and services for all departments except the School Department; and bids 
nstruction contracts for all departments except the School Department, all in accordance with Massachusetts 
tneral Laws. 

e Purchasing Office oversaw all Workers Compensation long-term cases and reported all Town and School 
iployee injuries. All property and casualty insurance claims received were reported to the Town's insurance 
Tier. Insurance renewals were processed, policies received, and vehicle, equipment and computer 
'entories maintained . 

addition to present contract renewals, the following were advertised, put out to bid, bids received with 26 
itracts awarded: Salt Consortium, HVAC System, Replacement of Town Hall Windows, Meter Van, South 
lin Street Waterway Improvement Project, Masonry, Dow Brook Conservation Area Boardwalk, Space 
lization Study, Appleton Park, Grade Crossing Engineering Services. Quiet Zone RFP, Snow Plow Contracts 
lance Committee Booklet, Disposition of DPW Vehicles, Overhead Line Clearing Vermette Ct. Substation 
ADA System, Disposition of Police Boat Trailer, Wastewater Solid Handling Study, Two One-Ton Dump 
lcks, Vermette Court Substation Construction, Sand Contract, Drug Testing/Medical Exams for the Town 
iployee Drug Testing and Injured on Duty. 

s Purchasing Office is also responsible for the compiling, editing, printing and distribution of this Annual 
wn Report. 



******** 



PARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY 

I ief of Police: Gavin J. Keenan 



j year 2008 brought renewed stability to the Police Department in terms of both staff retention and 
i ruitment. Officers Michel Tullercash and Patrick Carlin graduated from the Reading Police Academy and 
i )ined the Department in February. A permanent Executive Officer was appointed in July. Officer Aaron 
' »odworth joined the Department in September in a temporary full time position long funded primarily 
t 1 )ugh the School Department School Resource Officer Budget. September also saw the deployment of Officer 
I lin to the Iraqi theatre for service with the United States Air Force Reserve Medical Corps. He is expected to 
i )in our ranks in January of 2009, and deserves praise and thanks for his sacrifice and service to our country. 



1 s Department expanded the existing DARE Program in the Middle and Elementary Schools by training an 
a itional DARE Officer. A Community Resource Unit was established with the express mission to partner 
« t local and area agencies to provide services to the elderly, youth, and other vulnerable populations within 
t community. This unit participates in the TRIAD Program, conducted an automobile windshield etching 

57 



program with the Governors Anti Auto Theft Strike Force, and participated with the Recreation Department ii 
CSI Summer Camp Program. They have also worked with the Open Space Stewardship Coordinator to addrej 
the continuing problem of ORV / ATV trespassing in conservation property. 

In order to maintain a high level of skill and professional standards, the Police Department continued to provi 
training opportunities to the staff throughout the year. Officers receive annual training in CPR, First Aid, and 
Criminal Law. Officers must also complete a challenging requalification program in firearms. Two officers 
were trained as Field Training Officers and act as mentors to recruits and newer Special Police Officers. Two 
Sergeants graduated from the Massachusetts Police Leadership Institute in October. Detectives completed 
courses in fingerprint examination, crime scene photography, and cybercrime investigation. The Department 
also trained two officers in Crisis Negotiation. 

The Police Department Log reflected a total of 12,476 calls for service in 2008. Alarms, disturbances, medicE 
aids and reports of malicious property damage all increased noticeably this year. Conversely, responses to 
breaking and entering reports, motor vehicle accidents, and domestic complaints show a favorable decline. 
Reports of identity theft showed the greatest increase, which mirrors national trends in this type of activity. 
Residents are cautioned to use extreme care when using credit cards, internet purchasing, or responding to 
suspicious or misleading internet or phone queries. We also encourage you to call us if you think that you hx 
been a victim of this type of crime, or if you are suspicious of a caller. 

Alarms-790 

Animal Related - 249 

Adult Arrest / Summonses - 250 

Assaults - 26 

Assault / Dangerous Weapons - 5 

Breaking and Entering - 80 

Disturbances - 1 86 

Domestic Complaints - 85 

Fraud /ID Theft -36 

Harassing Calls - 29 

Juvenile Arrests / Summonses - 16 

Larcenies - 124 

Malicious Property Damage- 93 

Medical Aids - 875 

Missing Persons - 24 

Motor Vehicle accidents - 280 

Protective Custody - 1 3 

Suspicious Activity - 38 1 

Stolen Vehicle Recovery - 6 



58 



»SWICH FIRE DEPARTMENT 

rthur Howe III 
re Chief 




08 was another year of change and challenge for your Ipswich Fire Department. Among last year's highlights 
mid be: 

1. The appointment of Firefighter Lee Prentiss as the department's new training officer, 

2. Production of two movies in town, one at Castle Hill, another at Turner Hill, requiring Fire 

3. Dept. intervention, following small fire next to the Castle during production, 

4. Graduation of Firefighter Martineau from Regional Firefighter class, 

5. Multiple, serious brush fires in late April, each requiring mutual aid, but without injuries, 

6. Completion of 24 hour Hazardous Material Operational class in May by 26 Firefighters, 

7. Annual hydrant inspections completed in June. Approximately 650 hydrants inspected, 

8. 20 Firefighters performed training with and taught by U.S. Coast Guard in June. Training very well 
received, as we continue to strengthen our relationship with the Coast Guard, 

9. Five call firefighter resignations received (due to inactivity) during summer. Firefighter Michael Sikora 
hired for call force, 

10. Firefighter Rice appointed as temporary Emergency Vehicle Maintenance Technician, 

11. Generous donation of physical fitness equipment received from YMCA in August, 

12. Ipswich hosted Oil Spill Response training by MA DEP on Oct., 16 Ipswich Firefighters now trained, 
Oil Spill trailer received, and additional service now available to community, 

59 



13. Additional training during fall on emergency driving and decontamination, 

14. $23,000 of grant awards received during December thanks to Lt. Theriault and FF. Carlson. 

15. Five call firefighters entered training for driver operator during the fall, completion in 2009. 

We continue to provide a variety of services, both emergency and non-emergency, in a climate where there is ! 
increasing fiscal scrutiny and pressure. 1 hope and believe that we continue to offer an invaluable service to th j 
residents and to the community. Ipswich Firefighters are committed to a high level of service delivery and to 
doing so in a professional, compassionate, and respectful manner. We would ask your cooperation in properly! 
maintaining your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors, keeping your nearby fire hydrant clear during all 
seasons, keeping all building exits clear during winter snow conditions, and having a proper house number 
readily visible from the street. 

If the service you receive from us is excellent, please let me know. If the service does not meet your 
expectations, I would respectfully like to know that also. You can reach me at firechief@town.ipswich.ma.us 
at 978-356-6627. 

Thank you for the support and trust you continue to show us as we strive to build upon our professionalism. 
Most importantly, thank you to the men and women of the Ipswich Fire Department for the service they prov 
to our special community. 

Statistics: 

Calls for service: 1 808, broken down as follows: 

Structure fires: 26 
Other fires: 36 
Medical/rescue: 767 
False alarm: 265 
Mutual aid (given): 18 
Hazardous materials: 47 
Other hazardous responses: 117 
Miscellaneous responses: 532 






ANIMAL CONTROL 

Matt Antczak, Animal Control Officer 

In 2008, the new Ipswich (TNR) Tag, Neuter and Release Program caught 43 cats and kittens. Only three of 
those cats had to be released due to their behavior, the rest were found happy homes. Our Safe Cat campaign 
still going strong, informing all about why it really is best to keep cats indoors. ACO articles are fewer but si 
seen in the Ipswich Chronicle. Those articles contain useful information about wildlife, laws, programs and 
other information that the general public could find helpful. 

As some people do not realize, the Ipswich Human Group shares the shelter (that is also called the pound), th ; 
is where we keep all the lost pets that we hope will be found by there owner within ten days, or else the hurm j 

60 ! 






oup will find them a new home. This is the great part of this job, the help the volunteers give at the shelter 
ving love and helping to find new homes for these animals. 

le following is a list of the different calls this department responded to for the calendar year of 2008. 

ills on dogs: 

53 licensed dogs in Ipswich!! Wow! 

Picked Up 
Report Loose 
Impounded 
Adopted 
Hit by Cars 
Barking Complaints 
Dog Bites 
Quarantine Orders 
Dogs Euthanized 

lis on cats: 

5 Picked Up 

Reported lost 
3 Adopted 

Hit by Car 
I Reported stray or wandering 

Quarantines Ordered 

Returned to owner 

5 had 140 wild animals hit by cars with the deer causing the most in property damage. 35 too many cats and 
I *s were hit by cars. 3 specimens sent to the rabies lab with a negative result, 83 barn inspections to do, and 
1 00 calls in which all the hang-ups and the ones we spoke with were called back. We also released 2 T.N.R. 
| s back to their environment. 

i /as the second year with the Assistant ACT Gary Martin who has been a big help, the fourth year for ACO 
i tt Antczak, but more importantly the 26 th year with the help of the Ipswich Humane Group. And a big thanks 
t; he Town of Ipswich for the purchase of the new vehicle a year ago, it has been a welcome improvement! 






I RBORS DEPARTMENT 

1 rin Keenan, Chief of Police 

: Thomas Colpitts, Harbors Supervisor 

I icer James Zabelski, Assistant Harbormaster 

1 ( ■ year 2008 was a productive one for the Harbors Department. Improvements were made to the Town Wharf 

uding construction of a new deck platform as well as replacement of the two older wooden gangways with 
1 ' aluminum versions. The finger dock adjacent to the launch ramp was replaced as well. These 

61 



improvements were made possible through a combination of funding from the Waterways Fund and the State 
Department of Fish and Game. The 23' Parker Patrol Boat purchased in 2007 saw its first full year of service 
Additional navigational aids were purchased and installed to assist boaters and enhance safety for all users of 
our waterways. 

The Harbor Patrol had a busy year responding to a number of calls for service. These included medical aids, j 
search and rescue responses, reports of irresponsible operation of watercraft and vessels, a collision involving 
boat and PWC, and a tragic drowning in Plum Island Sound which occurred in September. In all of these 
incidents, as well as during the course of routine patrol; valuable assistance and support was received from th< ; 
Ipswich Fire Department Rescue Boat, U.S. Coast Guard, Massachusetts Environmental Police, and personne 
from Cranes Beach. The Harbors Department also works closely with the Waterways Advisory Committee ar] 
appreciates their many years of continual support and cooperation. 

Pump Out Boat operations commenced in May and continued throughout the boating season. This service is 
free to all boaters and removed approximately 3000 gallons of effluent from area waterways. 

Department Statistics: 

829 Mooring Permits Issued 
430 In-State Daily Launch Permits 
60 Out of State Daily Launch Permits 
21 1 In State Seasonal Launch Permits 
3 Out of State Seasonal Launch Permits 
Launch Fees Collected: $10,750 
Mooring Permit Fees Collected: $56,332 






SHELLFISH DEPARTMENT 

Arnold "Pick" Thistlewood - Shellfish Constable 

We were successful in having the road and ramp at Patterson's repaired for commercial clammers who use tl 
ramp to launch their boats when the Eagle Hill landing is closed due to rainfall closure. This project was pai 
for through the Shellfish Enhancement Fund which is funded through a surcharge on commercial shellfish 
licenses. 

We pulled up approximately 10 nets in Fox Creek because the clams have seeded in. We expect that this are 
will be harvestable in about 2-3 years. 

A boundary line was reestablished this year in the Rowley River because of questions raised about whether I 
area was in Rowley or Ipswich. This project was done at no cost to the Town. 

Jeremy Smith was hired this year as a deputy constable to assist with enforcement of our shellfish rules and , 
regulations. Scott LaPreste is my other deputy constable and I would like to thank both of them for their 
diligent hard work throughout the year. 

The Shellfish Department works in close association with neighboring Shellfish Constables, other town 
departments and the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries to monitor water quality on our shellfish be 

62 



his ensures that our shellfish remain safe for the consumer and that this valuable resource will be preserved for 
e future. 

11 shellfish beds were closed for 6 weeks this summer due to an outbreak of Red Tide. Our state legislators are 
irrently working on a red tide relief program to financially assist our commercial clammers. Rainfall closures 
:counted for 1 19 lost digging days, 
censes Issued: 



screational: 




^sident Family: 


155 


^sident Individuals: 


80 


Dn-Residents: 


227 


)tal Recreational: 


462 


ommercial: 




)mmercial Licenses: 


126 


/er 70 (free) 


15 


»tal Commercial 


141 



»tal Shellfish Licenses Issued: 



603 



timated Harvests: 
ft-shell Clams 
zor Clams: 
iividual oysters: 



19,880 bushels 
120 bushels 
8,220 



******** 



IBLIC WORKS DIRECTORATE 

bert C. Gravino, Director 

e Public Works Department is a customer focused service organization, dedicated to maintaining and 
proving the town's infrastructure through the efforts of a professional town work force, outsourced 
ltracting, and engineering consultants. With that as our mission, Public Works incorporates an on-going 
iew of what we do and how we do it, with the intent of delivering high quality service to our customers and 
lancing the quality of life in our diverse community. Customer focus, continuous process improvement, 
nan resource development, and resource management are the keys to our success. 

GHW AY DIVISION 



I ring the warmer months, the focus is on outdoor construction projects, where personnel skills and heavy 

t lipment produce significant infrastructure repairs and improvements to roads, sidewalks, public facilities, and 

I rmwater structures. A work order system was implemented in 2008 to prioritize, schedule, and track tasks. 

I RESTRY DIVISION 

5 focus of the Forestry Division in 2008 was on the maintenance of town trees along public ways and in town 
> "leteries, parks, and open space. The Forestry budget is reimbursed by the Utilities Department for line 
(| iring done for the Electric Light Division. 

63 



EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

Closer inspection and additional preventive maintenance of vehicles extends the service life and reduces the 
maintenance costs of a public works fleet. The equipment maintenance facility at the Public Works Garage 01 
County Road does not provide the level of maintenance required to adequately achieve this goal. Efforts are 
underway to design a replacement Public Works facility, including a vehicle maintenance and repair shop and 
indoor wash facility. 

TRANSFER STATION 

The Transfer Station accepts yard waste, specifically grass clippings, leaves, brush, and small branches, and i; i 
open Wednesdays and Saturdays, 8:00 AM until 3:30 PM. A 30 cubic yard covered roll -off dumpster is locatl 
at the Transfer Station to accept cardboard and recyclable paper from residents and businesses. White goods, 
electrical appliances, and televisions and computer monitors are disposed of curbside by the Town's trash 
contractor through the purchase of a $25 sticker, available at the Public Works office in Town Hall. The 
Transfer Station is operated by members of the Highway Division. 

Public Works' Special Collections are conducted twice yearly at the Transfer Station. We accept oil based 
paints and related products, car batteries, fluorescent bulbs, and tires. The fall collection is held in conjunctic 
with the Health Department's Household Hazardous Waste Collection Day to better serve residents. 






SANITATION 






Each pound of recyclable material that is diverted from the trash stream results in a reduction of our trash cos 
since the Town is charged a fixed fee for pickup of recyclables and a tipping fee for every pound of trash 
collected. The total tonnage of solid waste picked up in calendar year 2008 (3932 tons) decreased by 288 tori 
over that collected in 2007 (4220 tons), a decrease of 7% and a savings to the town of $26,500. 

SNOW AND ICE OPERATIONS 

The winter of 2007/2008 was a challenge for both Town employees and contractors to keep the roads, public 
sidewalks, schools, and town parking lots safe and passable during very difficult winter weather conditions. 
The cost for snow and ice operations exceeded the budgeted amount by $398,266. 

Access for emergency response vehicles is the first priority for Town crews during snow and ice operations. 
Snow removal from sidewalks in close proximity to schools is also a high priority after roadways are cleared, 
due to the reduction in student transportation by the School's bus contractor and the resultant increase in 
students walking to school. 






PLANT & FACILITIES OPERATIONS 

William A. Hodge, Sr., Director of Facilities 

Jane H. Spellman - Assistant to the Facilities Director 



64 




lis report contains the accomplished tasks of the Facilities Management Department during the calendar year 
■08. 



lily operations during this period included the response to and completion of 862 work orders with an average 
Dductivity rate of 92% from the Facilities staff, in addition to 42 major projects. 

e projected Facilities' mission for 2008 was to improve the overall appearance, safety, working and living 
nditions of the buildings within the Municipal Complex. Additionally, to upgrade the preventive 
lintenance to the buildings and equipment of the Town's facilities for safety and economic improvements by 
plementing service contracts from outside vendors and improving the job knowledge of the in/house staff. 

this end, six service contracts were advertised and awarded for Fire Safety, HVAC, Plumbing, Masonry, 
jvator, Generator, and Electrical Service. 

e major projects were completed with the additional funds allocated for this purpose and were accomplished 
outside contractors, I/H Staff and over 1200 hours of labor requested of and provided by the County 

! rrectional Facility. 

i e following are the major projects completed during this year: 

1 . Fire Station — mold remediation and hazmat clean up of the Central Fire Station cellar; a full section of 
roof removed and replaced; exterior rotted wood areas removed and replaced and the exterior painted; 
energy efficient windows installed, several areas of old and moldy carpet removed and replaced; 
deteriorated and mold infested kitchen sink base removed and replaced; deteriorated sections of the 
concrete floor replaced; first floor rest room renovated. 



65 




2. Police Station—the old flooring in Squad room and 91 1 room removed and replace with low 
maintenance rubber floor; exterior rotted wood removed, replaced and the exterior of the building 
repainted; the exercise area was carpeted, several energy deficient windows removed and replaced; ol 
deteriorated gutters removed and replaced. 




4. Town Hall—the plastic floor in the gym removed and the existing wood floor sanded, sealed and 
refinished; the bleachers and stage in the gym was sanded sealed and painted; the rotted, and energy 
deficient windows on the second floor front removed and replaced; several restrooms fixtures were 
removed and replaced; interior of the building painted; storage shed was added to the rear of the 
building; 60 foot guard rail was installed for safety by the river at rear of the building; to meet an EP/ 
mandate an area to the rear of the building was top soiled and seeded to retard water runoff into river; 
the rear of the building brick work that was pulling away and in danger of falling were removed and 
replaced. 



I 



66 




5. Library— all gutters covered with gutter guards; multiple electrical upgrades; the lifted unsafe brick 
pavers on the front entrance and side walk were removed and replaced; water damage to the interior of 
the Rogers room was repaired and painted; several upgrades were made to the HVAC systems. 

6. The Utilities Complex—WWTF removal and replacement of all exhaust fans, additionally HVAC and 
electrical upgrades; WTF had damaged gutters removed and replaced and gutter guards added; repair 
and upgrades to the electrical service at the WTF; Electric Office and building was painted on the 
interior and exterior; the roof was repaired; an in-wall AC unit was removed and a wall installed on the 
interior and exterior of the building; the concrete aprons in front of the roll up doors were removed and 
replaced; the Town wells had exhaust fans removed and replaced; new ladder and hand holds installed; 
the Town Wharf had electrical upgrades and exhaust fans installed. 

7. DPW Garage—connected the emergency generator to the fuel pumps; removed and replaced roof over 
entrance to the Office; upgraded unsafe electrical service. 

he coming year, the Facilities Department plans to continue to address the multiple problems within the 
I vn Physical Plant with a focus on energy, safety, esthetics of the Cemetery, Animal Shelter and Library, plus 
i re improvements on the other buildings as funding allows. 

* $ * $ * $ $ $ 



I METERIES/PARKS DEPARTMENT 

J tes Graffum, Superintendent 

I Cemetery and Parks Department is responsible for the care and maintenance of nine cemeteries and seven 
H cs, plus all town commons, the Ipswich resident side of Crane Beach and boardwalk, and Pavilion Beach. In 
a ition, we maintain all town-owned open space, Strawberry Hill, and the Dow Brook Conservation area 
1< ited on High Street near the Ipswich-Rowley line. During the winter season as weather permits, Bakers 
R d and the rink at Bialek Park are plowed off to accommodate skaters. 



66 



We also assist civic groups in the many activities that take place throughout the year as well as supply 
assistance to the Public Works Department in snow removal, sanding operations, and any other emergency 
situations as needed. 

We provide aid to the Town Clerk in setting up voting equipment and tables for all elections, as well as all 
supplies necessary for the Town Meetings held twice a year. 

The staff completed the installation of the final section of fencing along Town Farm Road at Locust Cemeterj 
cleared a six hundred foot path thru the woods at the newly-acquired property at Dow Basin, and assisted in tl 
construction of the elevated boardwalk in that area. 

A parcel of land was cleared at Clark Road adjacent to Clark Pond for the future site of an observation platfoi 

There were 96 interments in 2008. 

REVENUE 



Chapel Tent 


1350. 


Foundations 


5046. 


Openings 


38150. 


Perpetual Care 


6500. 


Sale of Lots 


6900. 



TOTAL: 



57946. 



******** 



DEPARTMENT OF CODE ENFORCEMENT 



James A. Sperber, Director 



JANUARY 1, 2008 TO DECEMBER 31, 2008 



Category / Construction 


#of 
Permits 


Total Fees 


Value of Work 


Additions 


24 


$18,549.00 


$2,228,750.00 


Attached Accessory 


3 


$418.00 


$47,000.00 


Certificate of Occupancy 


58 


$1,525.00 


$200.00 


Commercial - New 


4 


$9,434.00 


$1,094,200.00 


Commercial - Alter. 


21 


$31,997.20 


$4,376,925.00 


Decks & Porches 


34 


$3,770.50 


$365,350.00 


Demo & Reconstruct 


8 


$16,589.60 


$2,006,000.00 


Demolition 


12 


$934.50 


$142,100.00 


Detached Accessory 


44 


$5,635.00 


$486,508.00 


Fence 


10 


$655.00 


$42,060.00 


Multi-Family Dwelling 


1 


$2,100.00 


$300,000.00 


Miscellaneous 


24 


$2,560.00 


$283,302.00 



68 



Remodel/Alterati on 


154 


$35,013.91 


S4,243,543.00 


Repair 


68 


S5,628.31 


S563,088.98 


Roofs, Siding, Windows 


252 


$20,599.10 


$2,142,354.08 


Single Family Attached 


3 


$4,810.00 


$550,000.00 


Single Family Dwelling 


9 


S20,530.50 


$2,672,857.00 


Sign 


24 


$1,321.60 


S79,339.00 


Solid Fuel Burning Appliances 


31 


$2,205.00 


S79,507.50 


Swimming Pools 


4 


S310.00 


$23,431.56 


Tents 


73 


S35.00 


SI 13,595.00 


Totals 


861 


$184,621.22 


$21,840,111.12 



Plumbing 



Total Fees 



Gas 



Total Fees 



247 $17,380.00 



Electric Permits 



398 



213 



S9,840.00 



Total Fees 



$38,826.00 



jase remember that building permits are required for not only new construction, but for repairs and 
)lacement of existing structures, decks, sheds, signs, & fences also. 

lew Massachusetts Building Code for 1 & 2 Family Dwellings (7 th Edition) became effective 1/1/08 with 
ory new and substantial changes and requirements. Some have vast impact on snow and wind loads and 
'eral new state licenses have been created. The 7 th Edition of The Commercial Building Code becomes fully 
ective March 1, 2009. Either version may be used until then 

/ou have any question about whether your project may require a building permit, please call our office at 
$-356-6605. 



******** 



i ALTH DEPARTMENT 

• lleen Fermon, Health Agent 



Following is the yearly report of activities for 2008: 



Licenses and Permits Issued 
Food Service 
Retail Food 
Caterer 

Temporary Food 
Mobile Food 
Frozen Desserts 
Disposal System Permits 



Biological Haulers 

62 Septic Haulers 

32 Septic Installers 

8 Septic System Inspectors 

49 Swimming Pools 

5 Recreational Camps 

2 Motels 

82 Bottling 



1 

25 
57 
25 
9 
5 
2 
1 



69 



Tobacco 


16 


Funeral Directors 


2 


Health Inspections and Investigations 




Food Service Inspections 


172 


Housing Inspections 


31 


Nuisance & Environmental 




Complaints 


21 


Percolation Tests 


70 


Deep Hole Observations 


142 


Septic System Inspections 


195 


Swimming Pool Inspections 


13 


Bathing Water Testing 


77 


Recreational Camps for Children 


6 


Motels, Inns and B&B's 


4 


Sealer of Weights 




& Measures Inspections 




Liquid Measuring Meters 


65 


Scales & Balances 


89 


Scanners 






70 



Community Health 



Immunizations 




Toxoplasmosis 


1 


Influenza 


319 


Camphylobacteriosis 


3 


Pneumonia 


1 


Legionellosis 


1 


Well Elderly Clinics 


36 


Salmonellosis 


1 






Babesiosis 


3 






Hepatitis B 


3 






Hepatitis C 


4 


Disease Surveillance 




Cryptosporidiosis 


2 


Lyme Disease 


84 


LTBI 


3 


Brucellosis 


1 


TB 


3 


Denge 


1 


Streptococcus 
Pneumonia 


2 


Group B Streptococcus 


1 


Pertussis 


1 


Giardiosis 


3 


Human Granulocytic 
Anaplasmosis 


4 



Current Board of Health Members: Susan Hubbard, Chairperson, Spencer Amesbury and 
Charles Hill. 






ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Robert A. Gambale Chairman 
Benjamin Fierro III, Vice Chair 

There were fewer commercial petitions than in the past years. However, residential petitions 
were ample with residents continuing to improve their properties. In total the ZBA conducted 
over twenty-five formal hearings; with five of those for accessory apartments. Informal business 
consisted of deliberation over request for major and minor modifications to previously approved 
decisions and extensions of time. Two appeals of the Building Inspector's decision, one was 
overturned and the other was withdrawn. 

The Board granted the request of KC, LLC to withdraw its application, without prejudice, for a 
Comprehensive Permit under Chapter 40B for a residential development at 15 &3 1 Locust Road 
and 30& 34 Town Farm Road. 

The Zoning Board of Appeals is five-member adjudicatory body appointed by the Board of 
Selectman. Member Robert Gambale and Alternate Member Robert Tragert were re-appointed. 
Alternate member Robert Bodwell was appointed as a full member to fill the position vacated by 
Kevin Lombard. 



71 



The Board extends its appreciation and thanks to Kevin Lombard for his for many years of 
outstanding service to the town; he submitted his resignation in June. 

The Board would like to thank the Town Manager Bob Markel and Board of Selectman for all 
their support and assistance during the year. 

The Board also extends appreciation to the Planning Board, Conservation Commission and all 
Town Departments for their valuable input on projects, especially the Comprehensive Permits. 

Once again the Board wishes to express its appreciation to their support staff Jim Sperber, Code 
Enforcement Officer and his Assistant Eric Coville and Marie Rodgers Administrative Assistant, 
all who provide the Board with the assistance necessary to make the year 2008 constructive and 
meaningful for the Zoning Board of Appeals. 






DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT 

Glenn C. Gibbs, Director 

The Department of Planning & Development is responsible for guiding the development 
and conservation of land in the Town of Ipswich, both through the regulatory process and 
through the development and implementation of long-range plans. It does this in part by 
providing support and guidance for each of the boards and commissions within its 
directorate: the Planning Board, the Conservation Commission, the Historical 
Commission, and the Affordable Housing Partnership (reports on their activities are 
given below). The Department also provides support to the Open Space Committee, the 
Affordable Housing Trust Fund Board, the Design Review Board, the Agricultural 
Commission, and various ad hoc committees. Listed below are some of the initiatives 
undertaken by the Department in 2008: 

> Coordinated the successful effort to designate the Mercury Brewing and Distribution 
Company (MB) as a certified project. In exchange for state tax credit and minimal 
local tax relief, MB will renovate an abandoned building, create approximately 15 
full-time over the next five years, and commit to: undertake efforts to hire Ipswich 
residents, repave Soffron Lane, partially fund the construction of a sidewalk on 
Brown Square, market downtown Ipswich as part of business advertising, offer 
regular brewery tours, and contribute portion of proceeds from participation in 
community sponsored events to high school scholarships. 

5> Prepared a draft Downtown Development Plan, which includes an assessment of 
existing conditions, surveys of downtown users and business owners, and policies and 
recommendations to preserve and strengthen the vitality of the downtown. The plan 



72 



will be presented to the public and the downtown business community in the winter 
of 2009. 

> Developed a long-term plan and budget for the maintenance of open space parcels, 
funded by the Town's Open Space, Recreation, and Water Supply Fund. The plan, 
which was approved by the Selectmen in June of 2008, includes the hire of a seasonal 
laborer in the Cemetery and Parks Division to undertake necessary maintenance. 

> Under the direction of the Stewardship Coordinator, undertook a variety of 
stewardship efforts, including the following: completed the construction of the Dow 
Brook Conservation Area boardwalk and parking area, creating a trail connection to 
an extensive trail network in the watershed greenway; initiated the planning process 
for establishing an overlook platform for bird and wildlife observation at Clark Pond; 
extensively cleared understory and dead tree limbs along Smith Island path at 
Strawberry Hill, enhancing the viewscape; and organized pertinent records, plans, and 
legal documentation of the Town's Conservation Restrictions and initiated landowner 
contact as first step in monitoring process. 

> Drafted three zoning articles for fall town meeting, all of which were adopted (for 
more on these articles, see Planning Board report below); 

> Obtained a $7,000 Downtown Assistance Grant from the Commonwealth to provide 
development assistance for the conversion of a former town hall into a theatre, retail 
and cultural center. 

This past summer the Department was fortunate to have the services of MIT graduate 
student Jesse Kanson-Benanov, who in his role as summer intern provided valuable 
assistance on various planning initiatives, including the zoning amendments and the 
Downtown Development Plan. In December of this year the Department bid a sad 
farewell to Assistant Planner Kate Day, who left to become Senior Planner for the Town 
of Danvers. Kate provided the Town with five years of outstanding service. Though 
Kate will be sorely missed, she leaves behind a legacy of good works that will benefit the 
Town for years to come. 



******** 



PLANNING BOARD 

Tim Purinton, Co-Chair 
Jim Manzi, Co-Chair 

2008 marked another active year for the Planning Board. Despite a slowdown in the 
housing market, the Board was busy with a variety of reviews over the course of the year 
and continued to advance its goal of promoting appropriate and context-sensitive 
development in Ipswich. As in past years, the Board's membership continued to evolve: 
long-standing member Mike Ryan stepped down replaced with Cathy Chadwick, who 



73 



had previously served as an associate member. The Board welcomed Suzanne Benfield 
as the new associate member. The service of all Board members is deeply valued, and in 
particular we wish to acknowledge the very meaningful contribution of Mike Ryan 
during his years of service. Tim Purinton and Jim Manzi continued their roles as co- 
chairs in 2008, and members Bob Weatherall and Brian Hone continued their service as 
full Board members. 

Planning Matters 

The Board took an active role in the following major initiatives in 2008: 

> Zoning Changes . The Board sponsored three articles for the Fall Town Meeting, 
all of which were adopted. Perhaps the most significant initiative was the creation 
of the "Green Space Preservation Development" overlay zone to allow certain 
limited non-residential uses (i.e., research & development, offices, and 
manufacturing) on three large properties in the RRA and RRC districts. Another 
major undertaking was the complete rewriting of the zoning bylaw's hazardous 
and toxic materials regulations, to increase both their flexibility and their 
effectiveness. A third article addressed miscellaneous ambiguities, omissions or 
inadequacies of the bylaw, an annual housekeeping item in the zoning amendment 
process. 

> Community Development Plan Amendment . After holding a public hearing in the 
fall of 2007 on a draft amendment to the Town's Community Development Plan 
(CDP) to address sustainability, resource efficiency, and green design principles, 
the Board completed its review and voted to adopt the amendment in March of 
2008. 

Regulatory Matters 

The Planning Board took the following regulatory actions in 2008: 

> Issued a special permit for a wind energy conversion system (wind turbine) at the 
end of Town Farm Road. 

> Issued a special permit and site plan review approval for a brewery and brewpub 
for 2 Soffron Lane. 

> Approved several scenic road applications, providing for the protection and/or 
replacement of stone walls and trees on designated scenic ways in Ipswich. 

> Issued a special permit for an additional unit in a multi-family building at 8 1 -83 
Central Street. 

> Issued a determination regarding adequacy of access for a parcel of land located 
on Island Park Road. 



74 



> Issued a special permit for an additional unit in a multi-family building at 54-56 
Washington Street. 

> Approved a modification to the Ipswich Country Club special permit to allow 
setback waivers at 37 The Fairways. 

> Modified the site plan approval for a wireless facility at 40 Plover Hill Road to 
allow for the installation of additional antennae. 

> Issued a special permit to allow the partial waiver of a rear setback requirement at 
9 Abbott Lane. 

> Modified the site plan approval for the First Presbyterian Church on County Road 
relative to the reconstruction and installation of paved parking areas. 

> Modified a definitive subdivision approval at 19 Plains Road by deleting a 
condition relative to easement rights. 

The Board also reviewed and endorsed nine applications for ANR (Approval Not 
Required under Subdivision Control Law) plans. 

******** 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

David Standley, Chair 
Jennifer Hughes, Vice Chair 
David Pancoast, Conservation Agent 
Frances I. Doyle, Recording Secretary 

The Conservation Commission is comprised of seven appointed residents who serve as 
unpaid volunteers: David Standley (Chair), Jennifer Hughes (Vice-Chair), Glenn Wood 
(who did not seek reappointment in 2008 and was replaced by Karl Kastorf, formerly the 
associate member), Barbara Beaman, Sissy ffolliott, Brian O'Neill and Sharon Cushing. 
The end of 2008 also saw the departure of Recording Secretary/ Administrative Assistant 
Frances Irene Doyle, who was succeeded by Gail R. Surpitski, a local resident. The 
Commission thanks Glenn for his contributions over more than a decade of service as a 
Commission member, and Frances for her three years of dedicated service as staff 
support. 

The Commission is engaged in a variety of activities in behalf of the Town, including 
land conservation and preservation. Most of its time, however, is occupied with its 
formal role as the local environmental regulatory board under the Massachusetts 
Wetlands Protection Act and the Ipswich Wetlands Protection Bylaw, both of which 
focus on water resource regulations. 



75 



In 2008, the Commission continued regulatory oversight of several ongoing projects 
including the Riverpoint (f/k/a Ipswich Pines) 40B Housing Development. Approval was 
granted for major coastal erosion protection projects at Little Neck. The Commission 
addressed myriad official filings, requests, emergencies, violations and citizens' queries, 
as shown in the table below, and numerous unofficial requests, submissions, inquiries, 
and related matters that are not tabulated. The list compares the 2008 permitting activities 
with the previous five calendar years, to indicate trends and changes in the various 
tabulated categories, and shows the running average number of permitting activities over 
the past six years. 

To accomplish the permitting process, Commission members attended 24 regularly 
scheduled evening meetings and one special meeting, visited numerous projects and 
fielded dozens of Citizens' Queries. Staff continues to respond to hundreds of routine 
queries, and to inspect all proposed project sites before hearings and during project 
activities. 

The Commission's 2008 efforts in land acquisition and management of open space 
continued in concert with the Open Space Committee, the Board of Selectmen, the Open 
Space Bond Program Manager, and the Open Space Stewardship Coordinator. 
Accomplishments in 2008 included completion of the relocation of a wooded cart path 
providing access to the Dow Brook Conservation Area so as to remove it from an 
abutter's property. The Commission also evaluated possible trail routes for the Great 
Neck Conservation Area, but more planning is required to avoid disturbing significant 
wetland resource areas along the proposed route. 



Activity 


2003 


2004 


2005 


2006 


2007 


2008 


Avg 


Orders of Conditions/ 
Amendments 


39 


61 


56 


31 


32 


37 


43 


Orders Resource Area 
Delineation 


7 


3 


4 


1 


1 


1 


3 


Determinations of 
Applicability 


33 


41 


31 


22 


29 


34 


32 


Certificates of 
Compliance 


17 


18 


21 


28 


27 


11 


21 


Extension Permits 


5 


6 


6 


10 


5 


8 


7 


Enforcement Actions 


15 


17 


13 


11 


15 


19 


15 


Other* 


39 


67 


49 


37 


26 


30 


42 


Totals 


155 


213 


180 


140 


135 


140 


161 


* "Other" includes varioi 


js offic 


al filint 


?s not ta 


tbulatec 


in cate 


gories, 


such as 



Emergency Certifications & Minor Modifications, as well as scheduled Citizens' 
Queries. 



76 



Commission members continue to participate in the ongoing assessment of the Miles 
River, involving multiple communities along the entire length of that waterway, with a 
goal of restoring vigorous flows adversely affected by various factors and changes over 
the years. In the spring the Commission and the DPW measured the gradients of the river 
along its lower reaches from Hamilton downstream to Ipswich, to assist in analysis of the 
situation for planning purposes. The Commission continues to deal with the complex 
issue of appropriate responses to environmental changes resulting from beaver activity. 
Although a satisfactory unified methodology of dealing with this beaver activity increase 
for the entire Town has not yet been achieved, the Commission remains committed to 
working with other Town boards to address the management of this increased activity, 
and progress is being made toward that end. Renewed public interest in public land 
hunting policies and concerns has lead to the Commission revisiting its position on a case 
by case basis for the public properties which it administers. 



******** 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Peter J. Lampropoulos, Chairman 

The Ipswich Historical Commission held monthly meetings to meet its obligation to 
protect the historical assets of the town. The Commission addressed demolition 
questions and assisted residents who sought to make alterations to their historic homes. 
The Commission dealt with historic buildings located at the following addresses: 153, 
178 and 263 Argilla Road; 41 Candlewood Road; 98 Central Street; 88 and 126 County 
Road; 28 Estes Street; 39-41 and 100 High Street; 215, 417 and 421 Linebrook Road; 52 
North Main Street; 2 Soffron Lane; 16 Summer Street; and 35 Water Street. 

The Historical Commission voted to invoke a one-year demolition delay to encourage the 
preservation of the Moses Lord house (1797/1834) at 16-18 Market Street. The owners 
of 18 Market Street challenged the Commission's action, but the Superior Court upheld 
the Commission's right to institute the one-year demolition delay. 

The Mary P. Conley Preservation Award is one of the vehicles used by the Historical 
Commission to promote historical preservation in the town of Ipswich. The 2008 award 
was presented to Mr. & Mrs. Craig Hansen for their restoration of the Day-Dodge house 
at 57 North Main Street. 

In May Wilma Gooby and John Moss ended their many years of faithful service to the 
town of Ipswich as members of the Historical Commission. Their dedication and 
commitment to historical preservation in the town of Ipswich are very much appreciated. 

Fran Richards and Janet Trask volunteered to reorganize and index the records of the 
Historical Commission. Fran Richards was appointed Curator of the Historical 



77 



Commission for a term of three years; she will report directly to the Chair. 

The Historical Commission accepted records and artifacts from the Trustees of the 
Linebrook Parish. These records and artifacts have been safely stored and will be 
available for viewing upon request to the Historical Commission. 

Ongoing projects for the Historical Commission include: the Covenants Project, study of 
historical properties not adequately documented, discussion of the proposed 
Neighborhood Architectural Conservation District, assisting in the planning for the 
replacement of the High Street Railroad Bridge, and computerizing Historical 
Commission records. 

The Ipswich Historical Commission welcomes citizen assistance in adding to the 
historical knowledge of our town. 






HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 

Michael Schaaf, Chair 

AFFORDABLE HOUSING TRUST FUND BOARD 

Susan Monahan, Chair 

The mission of the Ipswich Housing Partnership is to promote and assist with the 
expansion and preservation of affordable housing in Ipswich that reflects the goals and 
character of the community. The Partnership works closely with the Affordable Housing 
Trust Fund Board, which was established in 2005 to oversee and expend funds paid to the 
Town for affordable housing purposes by developers as a result of zoning requirements. 
By its Articles of Incorporation, two of the Trust Fund Board members must be members 
of the Partnership, and the two groups often meet jointly. 

Initiatives undertaken and/or completed by the Partnership and Trust Fund Board in 2008 
include: 

> Supervising a grant of $22 1 ,650 in Housing Development Support (HDSP) Funds 
from the MA Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) to 
complete the substantial rehabilitation of a carriage house at 98 Central Street into 
a two-bedroom condominium to be sold to a low/moderate income, first-time 
homebuyer. (Low/ moderate income are household income that is less than 80% 
of the Area Median Income for Ipswich.) A successful bidding process to secure 
a contractor was recently completed and construction is expected to begin in the 
spring of 2009. The unit is to be marketed by the developer, the North Shore 
Housing Trust. 



78 




> Facilitating the resale of three existing, affordable units, deed- restricted to low/ 
moderate income households. The owners of these existing units sought to sell 
them to income-eligible, first-time homebuyers; in such cases, the Town is 
expected to either administer or assist with the marketing. By the end of 2008 
one unit was resold to a low/moderate income buyer, and two were pending sale 
to income-eligible buyers. 

> Awarding and monitoring $128,535 in expiring federal HOME funds. Through 
proposals by the Housing Partnership and approval of the Board of Selectmen, 
these federal funds were directed to five applications for affordable housing: 

o $ 1,080 for the creation of a permanently affordable one-bedroom 
unit at 56 Washington Street to be rented to a single person whose 
income does not exceed 50% of Area Median Income, or $29,450; 

o $ 33,000 toward the affordability of a two-bedroom duplex unit at 
98 Central Street to be sold by lottery for $147,000 to a household 
of three whose income -does not exceed 65% of Area Median 
Income, or $48,384 per year; 

o $ 77,455 in supplemental financing for the construction of the two- 
bedroom Carriage House unit at 98 Central Street to be sold by 
lottery for $151,000 to a household of three whose income does 
not exceed $59,550; 

o Two $ 10,000 awards in down payment assistance to income- 
eligible, first-time homebuyers. 

> Taking the initiative to preserve affordability in the resale of a Habitat three- 
bedroom house at 7 Ruth's Way, built on Town-donated land in 2002. At the 
request of Cape Ann Habitat for Humanity, the Partnership coordinated the 
marketing and buyer selection process which sought to sell the house for $73,788 
and secure as a new buyer a large family whose income did not exceed 50% of the 
Area Median Income. In December 2008 a family of five was selected to be the 
new owner of the property. 

> Redesigning the policies governing the Town's HOME-fiinded First Time Home 
Buyers Down Payment Assistance Program. The program now grants up to 
$10,000 per home purchase instead of the previous maximum of $6,500. The new 
terms for these zero interest loans now allow the forgiving of repayment, if the 
home is owned 1 5 years or more by the buyer. 

The membership of the Partnership changed in 2008. Attorney Donald Greenough 
stepped down after many years of devoted effort. Joining the Partnership in 2008 were 
Attorney James Kroesser and Ipswich Housing Authority member Moriah Marsh. Staff 
assistance in 2008 was provided primarily by Tom Bentley and Glenn Gibbs. 



79 



OPEN SPACE COMMITTEE 

Glenn Hazelton and Carolyn Britt, Co-Chairs 

With the arrival of our new and very capable Open Space Bond Manager, Kristen 
Grubbs, the Open Space Committee continues to search for creative ways to maximize 
the remaining bond funds with a top priority of identifying and acquiring land for the 
creation of athletic fields. The OSC continues to work the Athletic Fields Study 
Committee to this end. 




(Dow Brook Conservation Area Boardwalk) 



The acquisition of the Lynch property on Linebrook Road was completed and serves to 
protect a significant area of the Town's Zone A surface water supply. 

The OSC is continuing to study other funding options such as the Community 
Preservation Act for the protection/acquisition of land when the bond funds run out. 

The OSC, working with the Agricultural Commission, is seeking a Request For Proposals 
to study the existing farms and farmland in town for their ongoing protection, as well as 
the potential for expansion and promotion of additional agricultural pursuits in Town. 



******** 



AGRICULTURAL COMMITTEE 

Laura Russell, Chair 



Established in 2005, the mission of the Ipswich Agricultural Commission is to support 
and provide a voice for the significant agricultural community and resources of Ipswich. 
The Commission represents all forms of agriculture in town including: fruit, vegetable 



80 






i 



and other food crop growers; animal and dairy food providers, equine facilities; hay 
operations; florists and nurseries; and aquaculture. Trie Commission is compromised of 
seven appointed members as well as several alternate members. The current members of 
the Agricultural Commission are: Royce Knowlton, Donald (Eric) Galicki, Michael 
Marini, Diane Bailot, Diane Cassidy, Kat Kenney, and Laura Russell (Chair). Alternate 
members are: Fred Winthrop, Mario Marini, Mark Kozacki and Augusta Macrokanis. 
Several members were new in 2008 and the Commission is excited about the momentum 
gained with their participation and interest. 

In 2006-2007 the efforts of the Agricultural Commission concentrated on defining three 
year goals and objectives. The results are outlined in the Commission work plan: 

-Work with Town Committees and Boards, other local Commissions and organizations to 

establish solid relationships 

-Research beaver, deer and other wildlife issues (coyotes and geese) to develop ideas and 

strategies for improving the impact of wildlife on agriculture 

-Increase farming image and interest among the Ipswich townspeople 

-Reach out to landowners to understand issues and concerns and form effective avenues 

for communications between landowners and the Commission 

-Research estate planning and land succession issues 

-Develop a "Farmer's Toolkit" 

-Pass the Right-to-Farm bylaw 

In 2008 the Commission made significant progress in achieving these goals. Highlights 
of Commission activities are: 

Introduction to other town organizations and regular participation by Commission 
members in their respective meetings as Commission representatives 
Informational meeting with land and barn owners to gauge issues, concerns, and interests 
Participation in the Planning Department and Open Space Committee's "Analysis of 
Ipswich Agricultural and Agricultural Land" study currently underway in 2009 
Participation in a number of state-hosted and other meetings and conferences providing 
information and support for a number of the Commission's work plan topics 



DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES 

Elizabeth M. Dorman, Director 

The Recreation Department continued its mission to maintain a variety of programs, 
services, and activities to enhance the social, physical, and emotional well being of all our 
citizens. Our starfish logo seen on staff shirts and newsletters symbolizes our efforts to make 
a difference in the lives of local children and families. 



81 



Community events included the July 4th parade & field day, a Halloween parade & 
program, and parades on Memorial Day and Veterans' Day organized by local veterans' 
groups. Programs featured an outdoor concert by the West Newbury Volunteer Fire 
Association Band as well as one by the Ipswich Community Band, a UNH Caravan Show, a 
magic show during our annual "Harry Potter's Birthday" celebration, a staff and student 
talent show, and the annual "Foam Frolic" at Bialek Park. 




Summer offerings included tennis lessons at the high school courts, golf lessons at Ipswich 
Country Club, Workreation job training and social events for young teens, Jr. Summer Fun 
weeks, a Theatre Camp week, a CSI camp week experience coordinated by the Police Dept., 
a demonstration by the Essex County Canine unit at Bialek, Park and several field trips for 
enrolled youngsters. Swim lessons were contracted at the YMCA, and resident lot parking 
attendants were funded at Crane's Beach. 

Winter programs included two ski programs for grades 3-5 and 6-8, and February vacation 
week featured "Junior CSI", "Pirates Day coop with the YMCA,"Movie Stars", and our 
annual "Hogwarts School" Day. After school programs included homework and computer 
projects, crafts, adventure and sports activities, cooking, quilting and knitting projects, and 
weekly off-site trips. April vacation activities included "Animal Kingdon", "Explorers:" 
"Entertainment Day" in Melrose, and "Flying Things" with a visit to Beverly Airport. 
Children's golf classes were offered at the Rowley Country Club during spring and fall 
seasons, Friday Fun Nights continued for school aged children with crafts, gym games, and 
special events. Adult activities at Town Hall included basketball, soccer, ping pong, and 
user-funded sessions in bridge, Spanish, sewing, and knitting. Outdoor lights were used at 
Bialek Park for informal soccer and ultimate Frisbee as an adult softball league, spring and 
summer girl's softball, and youth football practices. 



82 



Town Hall facilities including a program room, kitchen and snack bar area, cafeteria/lounge, 
crafts room, teen Center, and gymnasium were scheduled by the Recreation Department so 
many local sports, scouts, and social service agencies could hold meetings and offer 
programs for residents of all ages. Gym space was shared by many youth basketball teams 
including the YMCA in the winter, indoor soccer, wrestling during the summer, and 
cheerleading in the fall as well as adult ping pong, basketball, and soccer. 

Another donation was received from the Friends of Ipswich Athletics to provide seed money 
for new playground equipment to replace the 1989 structures at Bialek Park. A committee of 
local parents and grandparents formed to review site and vendor options, funding, and 
projects to raise the balance needed for a fall 2009 installation in part of the rink area at the 
park. 

The seven-member Recreation Commission and Recreation Director met regularly 
throughout the year to discuss programs, facilities, and policies as well as to plan for the 
future. Members continued to volunteer at a number of our regular programs. 






YOUTH SERVICES 

Marcia Ford, Youth Director 

Youth services in Ipswich are dedicated to improving the lives of Ipswich youth by offering 
a number of varied programs to meet recreational, academic, and social needs of this unique 
population. Our foundation continues to be community collaboration, and many programs 
were developed as joint ventures with other local agencies in direct response to community 
needs. 

Community service projects were organized for volunteer teens, church and Scouts groups, 
and those referred through the local courts and Juvenile Diversion programs. They were 
involved in cleaning and painting projects at Town Hall and Bialek Park. Others provided 
help with our youth programs and some services for needy senior citizens. 




83 



After school enrichment continued and homework sessions led by staff and supportive 
volunteers were incorporated into the daily programs. Inter-generational experiences with 
senior citizens helped to teach knitting and quilting to interested youngsters. Thursday early 
release days provided opportunities for field trips to various educational and recreational 
sites. 

Talk To A Friend, our peer leadership program for grades 6-8, met weekly to receive 
training on current youth issues and discuss relationships with peers and family members. 
Students helped chaperone activities for younger children, assumed some mentoring and 
mediation responsibilities, and organized a family supper for an autism support group. 
Members help with set up and cleaning duties for weekly drop-in nights and receive training 
in sales procedures to operate an on-site snack bar that offers reasonably priced items to 
attendees. Some helped clean up Bialek Park and paint over graffiti on the play units. A web 
site for teens promoted current offerings and surveyed teens' suggestions regarding new 
programs and activities. A new high school level group was formed by TTAF "graduates" in 
the fall and have been engaged in similar offerings as the younger group. 

Family advocacy services were provided on an as-needed basis to families in need who met 
with the youth director to determine their current needs and secure connections to available 
services. Regular meetings provided further monitoring and coordination of related services. 
In addition, the director was available for after-hours support and crisis intervention for at- 
risk families. 

Regular training sessions were provided for summer and school year staff members to 
maintain their skills in safety practices, basic first aid, and motivation of students, conflict 
resolution, and group management. 






COUNCIL ON AGING 

Diane Mitchell, Director 

A wide variety of programs for senior citizens of Ipswich were provided under the 
umbrella of Council on Aging Services. 

A senior center operated weekdays, 8:00-4:00, at the Town Hall. Three part-time 
receptionists welcomed guests, answered the phone, and assisted with the daily operation 
of the center. 

Regular programs included a book discussion group, bridge and card groups, knitting^ and 
quilting groups, art classes, a monthly lunch club and a single friends group. Health-related 
programs included monthly health screenings, a low-vision support group, weekly blood 
pressure clinics, a monthly nutrition program, massage, hearing clinics, yoga, exercise, 



84 



ballroom dancing, line dancing classes and a swimming group. The COA Travel Club 
attended two overseas trip sponsored by the Friends of the Ipswich Elderly and day trips to 
various locations were held throughout the year. 

Special offerings included an inter-generational program, various dining programs, an 
Elderlaw Education program, a summer picnic, a North Shore Youth Symphony recital, 
computer clinics, speakers on a variety of health, financial and legal issues, social 
gatherings for special observances and classes for a wide range of interests. A monthly 
newsletter written by the Director reached 2000 elder households through support of local 
advertisers and a grant for postage. A Caregivers Support Group helped those dealing with 
frail elders. The Director continued to coordinate the Senior Citizen Property Tax Work- 
Off Program. A seven-member TRIAD Council consisting of local law enforcement and 
seniors offered safety awareness programs geared towards elders within our community. 

A handicapped accessible, 1 1 -passenger van provided local transportation to Ipswich 
seniors. Ipswich senior citizens were provided 4,816 one-way rides on the COA van, 
logging approximately 16,034 miles of service. The Friends group continued to raise funds 
and support projects that fell outside of the COA budget. The Friends also contributed to a 
Christmas party for 190 seniors held in the gymnasium of the town hall. Grants from the 
Executive Office of Elder Affairs and the Coburn Charitable Society provided a part-time 
administrative assistant, a part-time activities coordinator, and a volunteer recognition 
luncheon. 

The Outreach program enlisted a corps of 33 volunteers who provided 1901 hours of 
volunteer service to local elders. This program also provided volunteers who drove senior 
citizens 17,109 miles to out-of-town medical appointments. Other services of the Outreach 
program included social visits, phone calls; help with chores, and guidance in making 
personal, medical, housing and financial decisions. Other assistance programs included 
Money Management and Bill Paying for elders and free income tax preparation provided 
by trained AARP volunteers. 

A 7-member council met monthly to review programs and operations and plan additional 
offerings. 






EASTERN ESSEX DISTRICT 
DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS' SERVICES 

Terrance P. Hart, District Director 

This department is charged under Chapter 1 1 5 Massachusetts General Laws with providing 
services to veterans, their survivors and dependents. Principal workload under state law 
includes the administration of aid to veterans and dependents. Communities fund this program, 
which is subsequently 75% reimbursed the following fiscal year by the Commonwealth. This is 



85 



a need based program and the department is required to conduct periodic comprehensive 
review of the cases to insure no substantive facts have changed, while working with the veteran 
to identify alternative or long-term solutions to individual circumstances. During the calendar 
year 23 Ipswich veterans/widows were on this program for varying periods. Under state law 
the department also assists qualified veterans to obtain bonuses, and qualified veterans, widows 
and parents to obtain state annuities, property tax abatements, and other benefits. 

The Veterans' Services program also mandates extensive interaction within the federal 
community, principally with the Department of Veterans' Affairs. The Veterans' Service 
Officer (VSO) assists veterans and their dependents in filing for pensions, service connected 
injury/illness compensation, dependency indemnity compensation for survivors, VA healthcare 
enrollment, insurance claims, decedent claims, and many other issues. Federal benefits 
processed by this department are paid directly to those eligible to receive the assistance or 
entitlement. The VA sent approximately $1.69 million to eligible recipients in Ipswich, of 
which the current staff is responsible for approximately $61 1,000 dollars paid to or saved by 
those assisted in Ipswich. 

Additionally, the department interacts within the federal community to correct military records, 
obtain needed documentation and insure veterans/dependents receive awards and recognition 
to which entitled. The VSO provided information, advice or assistance to 98 of the town's 
1 147 identified veterans and 25 of the 282 identified veterans' widows during 2008. We also 
provide support and information assistance for National Guard and Reserves called up for 
service in Iraq or Afghanistan and their families. 

The Director and the Assistant to the Director, Georgia Gadbois, advocate for veterans on 
issues at the local, state and federal level, interact with elected and appointed officials on 
issues, and work with local organizations in serving the community. The department assisted 
the Ipswich War Memorial Committee in improving town memorials, and provided historical 
research for various individuals and organizations. 

Eastern Essex District is composed of the Towns of Essex, Georgetown, Hamilton, Ipswich, 
Rowley, Wenham and West Newbury. A Board of Directors consisting of one selectman (or 
designee) from each town maintains oversight. Mr. James Foley is the Ipswich member and 
Chairman of the Board of Directors. 



******** 

UTILITIES DEPARTMENT 

Tim Henry, Director 

ELECTRIC DIVISION 

The Light Department continues in the ISO's (Independent System Operator) Forward 
Reserve Market with 8 MW's of the power plant's generation assets. Under this program 



86 



the department is paid for being available for dispatch within 30 minutes of notification, 
Monday thru Friday. The operation of the plant in this market is being overseen by Jeff 
Turner as the Assistant Power Plant Superintendent. 

Kwh sales 

2006 sales 106,744,000 

2007 sales 107,856,587 

2008 sales 108,020,523 

A ballot referendum in May resulted in the approval (by a 4-1 margin) for funding of a 
1.5 Mw Wind Turbine to be located on town land at the end of Town Farm Road. The 
project will be collaboration between the Electric Department and the Schools. The 
schools received a $1.6 M Clean Renewable Energy Bond Authorization (CREB) from 
the federal government which will be used as part of the S4.2 M estimated cost for the 
project. When completed, the schools will receive a proportional share of the output from 
the turbine which is expected to be operational in 2010. 

Work started on the $7.5 M electric distribution system upgrade which was approved in 
2007. A major component of this project includes the replacement of the Vermette Court 
sub-station, as well as improvements to the Fowlers Lane and High Street sub-stations. It 
is expected that this project will be completed in 2009 and will improve the overall 
reliability of the electric system. 






WATER DIVISION 

Vicki Halmen - Town Engineer 

Total water pumping has remained at historic lows, the lowest volume in 19 years. The 
department actively promotes water conservation measures and continued the seasonal 
rate structure, which was started in 2003 to curb excessive summer water use. 

Construction began on the replacement of the South Main Street and Central Street water 
mains. These 10-inch cast iron mains are over 113 years old and are being replaced with 
12-inch ductile iron pipe. Earth TechlAECOM is the engineer for the project, which is 
being constructed by Tom Gioioso Construction, Inc. Construction will be completed in 
the spring of 2009. 



NEW MAINS 

There were zero (0) extensions to the distribution system in 2008: 

2008 



87 



New Domestic Services 


9 


Hydrants Installed 
Hydrants Replaced 
New Water Mains Installed (ft) 
Total Length of Mains (ft) 



9 

496,405 ■ 


Water Services 




Metered Services 


4633 


Unmetered Services 


99 Fire Lines 


Water Usage (Million Gallons) 

Reservoirs (Dow and Bull Brook) 200 
Brown's Well 59 


Essex Road Well 


18 


Fellows Road Well 


42 


Mile Lane Well 


33^ 


Winthrop Wells 


20 



Total Water Usage (MG) 372 






WATER TREATMENT PLANT 

Joseph Ciccotelli, Superintendent 

Joyce Kippin retired as WTP Superintendent in July 2008, ending a 20 year career with 
the Water Department. Joyce was a member of the feasibility committee responsible for 
the Water Treatment Plant's construction, and was instrumental in the start-up and 
operation of the WTP since it went on-line in May 1988. We all wish her well in her 
retirement. 

Joe Ciccotelli was appointed to succeed Joyce Kippin as WTP Superintendent. Joe had 
worked as Chief Operator at the WTP since 1995. Phil McCarthy was appointed to the 
Chief Operator position, and Scott Trask was appointed Assistant Chief Operator. Garry 
Dini returned to the plant as WTP Operator, in order to maintain adequate staffing. Garry 
had been working for the Wakefield Water Department. 

Approximately 15 new chemical feed pumps/anti-siphon valves were installed at all 
water supply wells over the past 18 months, as part of our ongoing preventative 



88 




maintenance program to upgrade equipment, consolidate pump sizes/types and increase 
reliability and performance. 

In 2008, several new Environmental Protection Agency and Department of 
Environmental Protection drinking water regulations began implementation 
(LT2ESWTR, Stage 2 DBPR: DOSE & UCMR2). These regulations resulted in the testing 
of numerous new analytes, including Giardia, Cryptosporidium, Insecticides, Flame 
Retardants and Explosives. The additional analytical costs were approximately 
$25,000.00. This first stage of analytical testing will not be completed until December 
2009. 



%%%%%%%$: 



WASTEWATER DIVISION 

Patrick J Brennan, Superintendent 

Dee-Ann Prentiss was hired in February to fill the open position created when John 
Messelaar retired. Dee-Ann has a grade 7 Wastewater Treatment Certification and has 
twenty years experience in the field. 

In May, the thirty plus year old generator and associated electric transfer equipment at the 
Town Warf Pump Station was replaced with a new Caterpillar 240 KW generator system. 
The previous unit had become less dependable and was cause for some environmental 
and safety concerns. Investigations into bringing the unit up to acceptable standards 
showed extraordinary costs with little assurance of long term reliability. The replacement 
will bring many years of uninterrupted service at our main pump station. 

Tighe & Bond Consulting Engineers were selected to review the treatment plants Solids 
Handling Process and suggest improvements to be considered in future capital 
replacement plans. Results of the study are due in early 2009. 

Significant Data from 2008 



• 



• 



382 Million Gallons of wastewater were treated at our Facility. 

8.2 Million Gallons of Septage were received and treated. 

65.3 inches of rain was recorded. 

2,936 cubic yards of Biosolids, removed from the wastewater stream, was 

dewatered and transported to the Agresource Compost Facility for beneficial 

reuse. 



89 



FINANCE DIRECTORATE - Rita M. Negri, Finance Director 



ACCOUNTING OFFICE 

Rita M. Negri - Town Accountant 

The Finance Director is the chief financial advisor to the Town Manager. She is 
responsible for the debt service, insurance, benefits, and other miscellaneous budgets. 
She submits revenue projections for budget purposes; meets with the Town Manager and 
department heads to review expenditure budgets; determines base budgets for the next 
budget cycle. She provides advice to the selectmen, finance committee, and school 
committee of any significant changes in the town's financial condition and changes in 
legislation affecting municipal finance. 

The Town Accountant's Office consists of two full-time staff, a full-time Town 
Accountant who also serves as Finance Director, and an Assistant Town Accountant. 
The Accounting Department is responsible for processing the payroll for all employees, 
processing invoices for vendor payments, and preparing all W-2's and 1099's at year-end 
in accordance with IRS regulations. 

The Town Accountant's Office maintains all of the accounting records for the Town's 
revenues and expenditures; ensures that reconciliations are performed between applicable 
Town departments; assists in providing information on benefits available to employees; 
and oversees the operation of the Town's financial computer system. 

The Town Accountant also coordinates the annual independent audit of the Town's 
financial statements that was last completed by October 22, 2008, for the year ended June 
30, 2008. The financial results for fiscal year 2008 were good. This was due to good 
collections on receivables, and responsible spending of appropriations. 

Free Cash for fiscal year 2008 was certified by the Massachusetts Department of 
Revenue, Division of Local Services on October 6, 2008 in the amount of $640,534. 



**^:^:***4: 



TREASURER/COLLECTOR 

Kevin A. Merz 



The Treasurer/Collector is responsible for the investment of all Town funds and the 
collection of Real Estate taxes, Personal Property taxes, Motor Vehicle and Boat excise 
taxes. The Treasurer/Collector's office is also responsible for all municipal borrowings, 
balancing cash and accounts receivable with the Town Accountant, selling beach stickers, 
accepting Passport applications, processing Municipal Lien Certificates and continuing 



90 



collection efforts of properties in Tax Title. Currently, the Treasurer/Collector's office is 
in the process of foreclosing on 1 8 parcels in Land Court. 

The Treasurer/Collector's office sold 5,581 beach stickers, 280 fishing stickers and 29 
horse stickers. 

In 2008, Kevin Merz passed the MCTA Certification Board's examination to become a 
Certified Massachusetts Municipal Collector, and Don Carter passed the examination to 
become a Certified Massachusetts Municipal Assistant Collector. 

Thanks also goes out to Corinna Warner, the collection clerk in the Treasurer/Collector's 
office, for her dedication, hard work and great customer service in 2008. 






ASSESSORS OFFICE 

Frank J. Ragonese, Chief Assessor 

The total valuation of Real Estate and Personal Property January 1, 2008, was 
$2,642,734,143. 

The valuation of the Town by Class is: 







$ 


% 


Class 1 


Residential 


2,357,738,535 


89.2159 


Class II 


Open Space 


- 


- 


Class III 


Commercial 


120,123,748 


4.5454 


Class IV 


Industrial 


134,995,230 


5.1082 




Personal Property 


29,876,630 


1.1305 




Total: 


2,642,734,143 


100.00 



The Tax Rate for Fiscal Year 2009 was $10.34 per thousand for all property classes. 



:|: $ $ $ $ $ :|: 



TOWN CLERK 

Pamela Z. Carakatsane, CMC 
Town Clerk/Election Administrator 



Population as of December 2008 - 13,724 Residents 



91 



Births 

Deaths 

Marriages 



Comparative Vital Statistics Recorded 
2006 2007 



2008 



116 


105 


90 


106 


68 


118 


52 


117 


59 



Shellfish Licenses and Permits 
2006 2007 



2008 



Resident Yearly 


84 


84 


100 


Resident Family 


128 


154 


174 


Resident Commercial 


125 


125 


125 


Over 70 Commercial 


17 


15 


14 


Over 60 Recreational 


22 


34 


22 


Non-Resident Yearly 


138 


196 


250 


Non-Resident Daily 


12 


53 


25 


Eagle Hill Stickers 


5 


5 


9 



Dog Licenses 

During 2008 the Town Clerk's Office registered dogs - 2,053 

Massachusetts Department of Fisheries and Wildlife 

Licenses Sold - 212 Stamps Sold - 122 

Elections and Registrations 



I. The Board of Registrars 

The Board of Registrars is comprised of the following members: 
Robert M. Stone, Chairman 
Peter Ross 
Jeremy Hathaway (appointed October 2008) 



92 



II. Town Meetings: 

May 13,2008 



Pamela Z. Carakatsane, CMMC, CMC 
Elizabeth McCarthy (resigned August 2008) 



Annual Town Meeting 

There were 724 registered voters who attended. 
Twenty two articles were on the warrant. 



October 20, 2008 Special Town Meeting 



There were 235 registered voters who attended. 
Eighteen articles were on the warrant. 



III. Elections: 






February 5, 2008 


Presidential Primary 






Votes Cast: 


4,874 




Number of Registered Voters: 


9,812 




Turnout: 


49.67% 


May 20, 2008 


Annual Town Election 






Votes Cast: 


5,140 




Number of Registered Voters: 


9,804 




Turnout: 


52.43% 



September 16, 2008 State Primary Election 



Votes Cast: 


1,335 


Number of Registered Voters: 


9,985 


Turnout: 


13.57% 



November 4, 2008 Presidential Election 



Votes Cast: 


8,167 


Number of Registered Voters: 


10,156 


Turnout: 


80.42% 



Registered Voters by Precinct as of December 31, 2008 

Precinct Democrat Republican Unenrolled 



93 



1 


565 


372 


1,369 


2 


660 


343 


1,626 


3 


434 


494 


1,677 


4 


564 


376 


1,647 


Totals 


2,223 


1,585 


6,319 



Also, Precinct 1 had two Green-Rainbows, one Working Families, two Green Party USA, 
and one Libertarian registered; Precinct 2 had one Libertarian and one Working Families 
registered; Precinct 3 had one Green-Rainbow and three Working Families registered and 
Precinct 4 had two Green-Rainbows, four Working Families registered. 

Thank you to my Assistant, Kathy Marini; Office Volunteer, Janet Trask; the Board of 
Registrars; the Constables, Wardens, Clerks, Checkers, Provisional Ballot and Tally 
persons; James Graffum and his staff; Rick Dorr and John Leonard and Jason Dorr; the 
Ipswich Police Department; the YMCA staff; and the staff at the High School/Middle 
School who help set up for Town Meeting. Also, to volunteers Andrew Agapow, Ronald 
Graves, Robert Stone and Phil Grenier and my family members who spend many hours 
setting up the night before each election. They all have helped to make each Election and 
Town Meeting a success. 









MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

Greg Parachojuk, MIS Director 

The MIS department is charged with the ongoing mission to develop, enhance and 
support the Town's computing and telecommunications infrastructure and, to provide the 
system and services necessary for the Town's departments and users to fulfill their stated 
goals and objectives. As a board member of "ICAM", Ipswich Community Access 
Media, Inc. my charter is to provide technical input as to the needs of our public, 
educational, and government sectors in conjunction with cable broadcasting. This year 
we brought online a computerized television bulletin board system that can be managed 
remotely. 



94 



A new fiber based "Municipal Area Network" is now in place connecting 15-total 
Municipal, School, and Utilities buildings. Aside from reliability, speed and economy of 
shared services, are direct benefits. 

This year we also brought online a departmental Laserfiche Document Imaging System to 
begin the process of computerized document management. 

Please visit our website at http://www.town.ipswich.ma.us to access assessment data, tax 
maps, minutes, online payments, forms and other useful information. 



******** 



IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Victor Dyer, Director 

Collections: New books added: 5113 (Adult & Young Adult) and 3173 (Children). New 
media added: 946 (Adult & Young Adult) and 236(Children). 

Technology: 10,200+ patrons signed up to use the Internet PCs while 21,400+ hits were 
recorded on the library's web site in 2008. The library made available for use one new 
database: Mango Languages. 

Staff: Susan Brown was hired as Library Technician when Lynne Holton retired. 
Emmanuel Piras was hired as Page in the Children's Room when Hilary Nardone left for 
college. Michelle Guvendiren returned as Temporary Summer Assistant in the Children's 
Room. 

Volunteers: This year Volunteers donated over 1598 hours of service. The library 
enjoyed the services of a senior volunteer through R.S.V.P. of Gloucester again this year. 
The library benefited from the hours of several community service high school students. 
The Ipswich Garden Club decorated the library for the holidays while Dorcas Rice 
decorated the mantel in the Rogers Room. 



95 




Board of Trustees: The Board approved a new Art Exhibit Policy and a revised Meeting 
Room Policy. The Board also approved CORI checks for all staff and volunteers 
henceforth. The Board paid for the installation of four new light fixtures in the Browsing 
Room. These fixtures complement and enhance the newly-painted ceiling plasterwork. 
The Board also authorized the construction of the new Children's Plaza outside the 
Children's Room and the recalibration of the Archives HVAC system. All of these 
projects were funded from LIG/MEG state aid monies. The Board agreed to pay half the 
cost of the online tutoring service Live Homework Help® for Ipswich students. The 
Ipswich Public Schools agreed to pay the other half of the cost for this service for two 
years. The Board approved the new Plan of Service for 2009-2013 in June. 

Plan of Service: We continue to make progress on realizing the goals and objectives of 
our Plan of Service for 2004-2008. In the spring work began on the new Plan of Service 
for 2009-2013. Over 500 survey forms sent out with utilities bills were returned to the 
library for use in planning future library services. Some of the activities accomplished in 
2008 included: language arts collections (400s) evaluated and improved, two genealogy 
lectures presented, Arts Committee organized, online tutoring service (Live Homework 
Help through Tutor.com) offered to all Ipswich students in cooperation with the Ipswich 
Public Schools. 

Public Relations: The library produced two issues of The Newsletter in 2008. The 
Ipswich Reads. ..One Book! Program continued into a fourth year with Julie Otsuka's 
When the Emperor Was Divine. Betsy Johnson's 'Library Life' column continued its 
occasional run in the Ipswich Chronicle. The Children's Room brochure was revised and 
reprinted. The library's logo was featured in Elizabeth Doucette's new book, Creating 
Your Library Brand. 

Building: The new Children's Activity Area was dedicated in June. Brick paving outside 
the front door of the library was reset and pointed. New shelving was installed in the 



96 



Young Adult area to accommodate the entire YA fiction collection formerly inter-shelved 
with adult fiction. 

Friends: The Friends supported the library with funds for audio-visual materials, binding, 
supplies & children's programs. They purchased for the new Children's Activity Area 
two sets of bistro chairs and tables. The Friends also underwrote two lectures on 
genealogy by the staff of the New England Historical and Genealogical Society. The 
Friends paid for the printing of the new Plan of Service and the new Children's Room 
brochure. They also agreed to underwrite the monthly maintenance of the fresh water 
aquarium in the Children's Room. 

Bequests & Gifts: Donations were received in memory of James W. Pappas, George & 
Mary Gray, Virginia Jackson (former Chair of the Board of Trustees), Stephanie Marie 
Rose, Peter & Patricia Zaharis and Myron Taylor. Other donations were received from 
Mrs. Nathaniel Clap, Richard & Diane Nunziato & Jocelyn Duff. A book donation was 
received in memory of Kristen Bartniski De Metrio. Mr. Bruce Lord donated his 
collection of nearly nine hundred Ipswich postcards to the Library. EBSCO Publishing 
paid for the installation of UV light filtering film on the Children's Room windows. 
EBSCO donated one thousand 'green' tote bags, library website address printed on one 
side and the EBSCO logo with "Come Work with Us" on the other side. EBSCO also 
donated a PC for the Archives through an Ipswich Historical Society grant. A $500 
donation from an anonymous donor for "public computer service" was received in 
December. Fifteen hundred dollars from another anonymous donor was used primarily to 
purchase library materials. Mr. Umesh Bhuju of Zumi's Espresso donated a freshwater 
aquarium to the Children's Room. 



Programs: The Children's Dept. offered 176 programs with 3,598 children participating. 
There were 20 Adult/YA programs with 234 participants. The ESL program continues to 
match students with tutors. The Children's Room sponsors a winter chess club for kids in 
the Collins Room. A very special program was the festive dedication of the new 
Children's Plaza on June 7th. More than fifty people attended this event which featured 
storyteller J.T. Turner and musician Orville Giddings. 

Circulation: Total circulation in 2008 was 141,474 items. [This is a 10.5% increase over 
2007] The library borrowed monthly, on average, 1 1 00 items through interlibrary loan. 
[This is a 23% increase over 2007] 

Grants: The library received a $1400 grant from the Coburn Charitable Society for the 
purchase of large print and audiovisual materials and a $600 NMRLS Supplementary 
Deposit Collection grant which was used to further develop the collection of audio-books 
in the Playaway format. The library was awarded a Public Libraries Fund matching grant 
of $576.42 by the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners. These funds were 
used to purchase books on CD. The library was awarded a two-year $20,000 Teens & 
Tweens grant, federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of 
Library Commissioners. 



97 



Archives: We logged in 416 visits to the Archives by researchers & volunteers in 2008. 
A collection of materials relating to the Ipswich lighthouse and lighthouse keeper 
Benjamin Elsworth was processed. Sheila Bodwell donated a collection of materials on 
Ipswich women's groups. 






SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

Richard L. Korb, Superintendent 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Joan Kelly Arsenault, Chair 

The FY09 school year could not have been as successful without the passing of the 
School override. We continue to thank the citizens of Ipswich and the Turn the Tide 
Committee for all of the support you have given the children of the Ipswich Public 
Schools. The override has allowed us to restore and maintain many educational programs 
in the FY09 budget. 

Despite the override, the FY09 budget has faced mounting fiscal problems at the local 
and state level with the need to cut the FY09 budget, eliminating professional 
development and placing a budget freeze on all spending. FY 10 looks bleak and we 
continue to look for your advocacy and input as we make difficult decisions in order to 
work within the funds available for the school budget. 

Even in the midst of continued limited funding at both the state and local level, the 
Ipswich Public Schools remain highly recognized for their excellence in academics, fine 
arts, music and athletics. The students, faculty and administration deserve our applause as 
they continue to demonstrate and embody the highest dedication, standards and 
professionalism that have made the Ipswich Public Schools an outstanding educational 
system. 

The School Committee wishes to applaud the leadership provided by the administration 
and staff in teaching our children how to become model citizens. The Ipswich Public 
Schools continue to educate our children on the importance of respect, responsibility to 
community and service above self. This year Middle School and High School students 
are traveling to China for what we hope will be a yearly exchange program. We are very 
excited about the experiences our students interacting with another culture. We look 
forward to the many stories and life changing memories that our children will bring back 
from exposure to the Chinese society. The involvement of Winthrop and Doyon students 
in anti-bullying programs, student leadership programs, recycling efforts, and visits to 
local nursing homes to name a few, exemplifies their commitment to building character 
and uprightness. It is apparent that the children of the Ipswich Public Schools not only 



98 



have made their mark academically but also are model citizens, representing our town 
values locally, nationally and globally. 



******** 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Richard L. Korb 

The FY08 school year was once again filled with numerous challenges and rewards. We 
continued to face mounting fiscal problems impacting the school district's ability to 
deliver the educational services this community has come to expect and deserve. 
Programs were reduced and staff cut in order to balance the budget. However, the 
passage of the Override in May 2008 helped us maintain and restore educational 
programs for the FY09 school year. We are grateful for the community support that the 
override had. 

In spite of financial challenges, our dedicated and talented staff continues to adopt the 
philosophy that we must always move forward as we look for ways to continue to 
improve. 

Our Birth to Three Program is flourishing, now serving over 700 families in the 
community. This Program is funded by a grant from the Commonwealth. 

Our "Tiger Tots Learning Center" day care program for school employees and citizens of 
the community continues to flourish. This program is self-supporting through fees, 
grants and gifts. 

Our MCAS scores continue to place us far above the average for the Commonwealth in 
the majority of all categories. However, even with that success, we continue to strive to 
improve our scores and get better. Each year teams of teachers spend hours analyzing 
our test results and make the necessary adjustments in our curriculum to ensure that we 
are aligned with the State Frameworks. 

The FY08 school year continued to see the School Committee and Administration 
working collaboratively on a number of subcommittees and related issues. Budget 
development, policy development, technology, professional development, Feoffees and 
athletics were key areas of focus. 

The FY08 school year also saw the continuation of our District- Wide Capital 
Improvements and energy projects. The most significant project was the Town Meeting 
vote to approve bonding for the Town/school Wind Turbine Project. With the 
completion of this Project, we will see significant savings in our overall energy costs to 



99 



the district. During this same time period we also addressed numerous smaller energy- 
related projects which have resulted in more energy efficient buildings. 

The Ipswich Public Schools continue to be recognized across the Commonwealth for our 
innovative educational initiatives, including the integration of technology into our 
curriculum. Decisions regarding curriculum development are made by our Subject Area 
Committees consisting of teachers and Administrators, thus keeping the decision making 
as close to the classroom as possible. High School, Middle School and elementary school 
staff met jointly to ensure that our curriculum is seamless, thus providing our students 
with a comprehensive K-12 curriculum. 

The goai of the Ipswich Public Schools is to identify and access resources and implement 
strategies that improve teaching and learning, enrich programs and inspire students and 
teachers. It is through a very special internal culture within our school system that we are 
able to turn this goal into reality through a variety of building-based initiatives and 
programs. The ultimate goal of this special culture is to have students become self- 
directed learners who strive toward continuous improvement through reflection and self- 
assessment. 

In conclusion, I want to express my sincere appreciation to the citizens of Ipswich who 
have given so generously to support quality education for all of our children. I also want 
to thank those local businesses and organizations that continue their support of our 
programs through gifts and donations. 

Finally, I want to express my sincere appreciation to the staff of the Ipswich Public 
Schools, whose dedication and commitment to excellence is second to none. 






IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL 

Barry Cahill, Principal 

While every year brings challenges, the 2008 school year brought a significant number of 
serious issues to the fore. The first half of the year (the second half of the 07-08 school 
years) was framed by the process of requesting a substantial Override from the Ipswich 
community. 

In addition to great parent and citizen participation at the various budget meetings held by 
the School Committee and Finance Committee, the Turn the Tide group did an 
outstanding job of identifying needs and responding to questions. We are very grateful 
for the financial support of the community. Accolades reflected the superb culture and 
excellent education provided the Ipswich Public Schools. 



100 



Our Jazz Band continued its long tradition of success by receiving a Gold Medal in the 
Jazz Festival. They had the unique privilege of being the first high school in ten years 
invited to perform at the Newport Jazz Festival. Many participants entering the Festival 
on the Saturday morning session mistook the IHS Jazz Band for a professional group. We 
are extremely proud of our entire music program including Concert Band, Chorus, 
Orchestra and Select Groups. Our community can feel great pride in this program. 

MCAS scores continue to be excellent. The spring 2008 MCAS results show that 99% of 
the students passed English Language Arts and 97% passed Mathematics. Meeting the 
newest Science graduation requirement, 97% passed the Biology Exam. 

The Class of 2008 continued the success of our most recent classes. 90% of our graduates 
were accepted to colleges, with 80% accepted to a 4 year college. Top schools included 
Boston College, Holy Cross, Middlebury, New York University, Skidmore, Smith, 
Trinity, Tufts, UMass and Wake Forest. Well over 150 colleges and universities accepted 
members of the Class of 2008. 



******** 



IPSWICH MIDDLE SCHOOL 

Cheryl Forster, Principal 

I am pleased to be reporting to the citizens of Ipswich in my fourteenth year as principal 
of this dynamic and exciting school. I was honored to be named the Massachusetts 
Middle School Principal of the Year for 2008-09 by the state association and look 
forward to additional leadership in this area. We are now in the ninth year in this building 
enjoying the warm learning environment we have created here together. The school 
design has allowed us to get to know our students very quickly and each grade has 
developed its own culture creating three distinct neighborhoods. The facility has allowed 
students and teachers to access state of the art technology as well as world-class art, 
music, and drama programs. Our two gyms are never empty during the day or weekends. 
Our students continue to learn "new basics" along with the old ones, as we find that both 
are truly important in today's world of work. 

Educating students has never been more challenging with the added mandated testing we 
now administer in all grades. Test results we received validated the good work being 
done in our classrooms by our teachers. MCAS testing is completed every spring and 
Ipswich continues to do very well. Every year, in all fifty states, a random sample test is 
administered to all fourth and eighth graders in math and science. The test is called 
National Assessment of Educational Progress or NAEP. We are proud to announce that 
we were part of the lottery in this testing and that Massachusetts eighth graders had the 
highest scores of all fifty states in both mathematics and science. An education in 
Massachusetts is considered to be the best in the country. 



101 



Ipswich Middle School is adding global education to its goals. We have developed a 
sister school relationship with Tianjin, China. I was honored to travel there last year and 
we have received permission to bring a team to Tianjin next year. The world is shrinking 
and we will give our students the best possible chances for success by opening the doors 
on the other side of the globe. 




Excellent middle schools strive to reach the all-important whole child. Each grade level 
specializes in exploratory and child centered topics that offer a variety of learning 
experiences and opportunities. At the Ipswich Middle School we work in a "team" 
approach. The schedule allows for teachers to meet daily and discuss student's progress; 
technology is readily available and class size is limited for maximum skill building. It is a 
cooperative venture. 

Middle School is a time of choices and contrasts. Whether it is the quiet solitude of our 
peaceful courtyard complete with koi fish, or the pandemonium in the gym created by 
middle school energy — there is something for everyone here at IMS. 

Students in grade 6 spend an intensive and focused week in the spring at an 
environmental camp, Ferry Beach in Saco, Maine. All of our sixth grade staff attends to 
form close bonds with the students. The outdoor marine curriculum is high interest, and 
many new friends and relationships are forged. 

Grade seven students learn first hand about the local ecology with a series of eight 
separate days in the woods, marshes and in canoes on the Ipswich River, seeing first hand 
where their river begins and ends. They canoe through miles of forest, wetlands and 
marsh, collecting data all the way and brainstorm ways to protect our precious 
environment and natural resources. 

Grade eight students spend four days in early June in the Adirondacks in upper state New 
York. A geology focus helps prepare them for visits to chasms and caves and learn the 



102 



difference first hand between stalactites and stalagmites in Howe Caverns. They cruise 
the glacial lakes and rivers and come to appreciate the power of erosion and glacial 
landforms. It is a wonderful culminating experience for them as they leave Middle 
School. 

We continue to provide an after school homework program for all interested students and 
their families and we understand the need for students to be busy and supervised after the 
last school bell rings. We offer many enriching programs to meet the interests of all types 
of children. Our drama, dance and music departments involve more than half of our 
student population. Student athletes participate in sports programs that teach skills, 
sportsmanship and wellness. At the peak of intramural basketball season, more than 250 
students are involved. We offer golf, tennis, soccer, ice hockey, softball, volleyball, field 
hockey, basketball, art club, outdoor club, music programs, drama and monthly dances. 
We teach a course called "People Smarts" which focuses on interpersonal skills and 
multiple intelligences. A monthly "service" component has taken the form of food pantry, 
shoe and coat drives, Rotaplast, soldier boxes and turkey dinners. We also participate in 
the annual "Walk for Hunger" where together we walk a 10-mile circuit around Great 
Neck and back to raise funds for the Ipswich Food Pantry. 

We are proud to be part of such an innovative and exciting learning environment. Our 
outstanding professional faculty works diligently to clarify our vision for education — that 
every child can learn. Out thanks goes out to the parents in our school community who 
mobilized and were key players in the passage of the override. This was both validating 
and desperately needed in these times of fiscal challenge. We are constantly finding new 
ways to reach and teach all children who come to our school — they are after all, the 
future of Ipswich. It is an exciting time to be working with young people. Our slogan is 
"making a difference starts here." We believe that, we love our work and we invite you 
to join us. 



******** 



PAUL F. DOYON MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

Kenneth B. Cooper, Ph.D. Principal 

This was not a year for the "timid" given both the fiscal as well as the educational and 
academic challenges we faced in 2008. With outstanding teamwork and remarkable 
community support we managed to emerge relatively "intact." 

Our School Improvement Plans once again targeted "Literacy" as a key area for 
improvement and professional development. Having just completed a multi-year effort 
to enhance our teaching of "reading comprehension strategies," we formed a "Writing 
Committee" with broad representation from both regular and special education faculty, 
to research and brainstorm how to best move forward in that area of literacy. The 
suggestion was made and adopted by staff to form Study Groups to explore several 



103 



different approaches to writing instruction. We have begun this initiative and expect it 
to be a multi-year effort. Many thanks to the Doyon FRIES (Friends of Ipswich 
Elementary Schools) for helping us to acquire some of the necessary source materials. 
Recent efforts in terms of academics also included a focused exploration of how we 
assess literacy skills and student progress at each grade level. We are hoping that the 
faculty group leading this improvement effort can help us become more consistent in 
terms of assessments used within grade levels, more coordinated as we assess student 
skills across grade levels, and also help us design a summative instrument to be included 
in student cumulative folders to document all key literacy assessment outcomes. We 
have also begun piloting use of an objective bi-annual math assessment call the 
GMADE (Group Mathematics Assessment and Diagnostic Evaluation) to increase 
consistency and coordination in the area of math assessment. In terms of MCAS scores, 
Doyon students continue to do very well in all grades and subjects, exceeding state 
averages in all areas and reaching new "personal bests" in several. With funding from 
the override we were again able to provide support tutoring for students whose 
individual results fell below expectations. Several other ongoing academic initiatives 
include the process of seeking National Association for the Education of Young 
Children (NAEYC) accreditation for our kindergarten programs, and researching the 
pluses and minuses of moving to a trimester grading approach which is being used in 
many of the surrounding communities. 

This past year we continued our school safety and character development initiatives. The 
Ipswich Fire Department provided fire safety programs; the Ipswich Police Department 
provided the DARE program and a stranger awareness program in grades four and 
kindergarten respectively; the H. A.W.K. (Help for Abused Women and Children) 
organization again presented an anti-bullying program at several grade levels; our 
Guidance Department presented a six-week program called "Talking about Touch" to 
grade two students; the District Attorney's office presented an Internet Safety program to 
students in grades four and five, and the Doyon FRIES funded a wonderful anti-bullying 
school wide assembly program called "Wizards and Knights." The FRIES also provided 
funding for our "Student Leadership Team," (SLT) and Rotary-linked Early Act 
programs with fifteen faculty and staff mentors working alongside more than 120 
(approximately 75% of the classes) fourth and fifth grade students. Some of the projects 
included helping younger students in classroom work or physical education, art or music 
classes, volunteering in the library, assisting with recycling efforts, planning school 
"Spirit" days, and providing assistance during Grandfriends Days. We believe that in 
providing students with opportunities to contribute to our school and to our community, 
as well as to other communities in need, we are having a positive impact on students' 
sense of responsibility, and empathy for others, while also building their own self- 
esteem. 

Last year's valiant campaign on the part of the community in support of the budget 
override represented a heroic and successful effort to keep Ipswich's educational 
program moving in the "right" direction. The override enabled us to "put back" a 
number of positions and programs that had been cut over the years, helped us stave off 
additional staff cuts, and provided funds for technology, tutoring, educational materials, 



104 



and professional development which had been sorely lacking for years. While we are 
still in very precarious fiscal times, the support this past year for quality education in 
Ipswich was an impressive affirmation for us in the schools. Thank you all. 

On this, the occasion of my twenty-second annual report, I would like to extend a 
special thanks to all in the Ipswich Community who have become part of the extended - 
Doyon Educational Community by contributing their time, efforts, expertise, energy and 
resources~we literally could not do this without you. I am of course very fortunate to be 
able to spend my working hours with a delightful and hard-working student body, and 
with the very talented and dedicated faculty and staff of the Doyon School—it is a 
pleasure and an honor to work with them. 






WINTHROP ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Sheila Smith-McAdams, Winthrop School Principal 

The past year goes down in Ipswich's educational history as an incredible year of 
renewed commitment to and community involvement in establishing educational 
priorities. Through open discussions and multiple forums, members of our community 
shared their philosophies on the magnitude of educational resources necessary to properly 
prepare our children for their future. While variations and differences exist, it was a 
prime example of democracy in action. Our children were watching as this stewardship 
for their education took shape. 

In an academic school year, field trips help students generalize their knowledge and relate 
it to the world around them. Our community provides such wonderful resources, allowing 
for experiences unable to replicate in the classroom. From science-related trips to 
Bradley Palmer, Willowdale and Crane's Beach to art exploration at the Heard and 
Whipple House, historical trips to Essex Shipbuilding Museum and the Peabody Museum 
at Harvard University to an invitation to the State House, students recognized the richness 
of learning opportunities in their own community. 

Throughout the year, a focus on respect for oneself and others permeates daily 
instruction. Programs that more explicitly address issues of respect and character took 
shape last spring. HAWK (Help for Abused Women and their Children) staff, Officer 
Cole and the Ipswich Police and the Respect and Responsibility Committee, led by our 
own School Social Worker, Deb Trevarrow, and all raised awareness of respectful 
behavior, bullying and peer pressure. For the third year in a row, fifth grade students 
supplemented their traditional studies with ballroom dance instruction. Meant as a way 
to highlight respect for others, the students shared their new-found skill and appreciation 
for ballroom dancing with the community at a March performance and a May visit to the 
Caldwell Nursing Home. 



105 



For the first time in many years, funds were available to support summer curriculum 
work by our talented professionals. The Professional Development Plan, having waited 
patiently on the shelf for several years, was put into action. Though strictly voluntary, 38 
out of 44 staff members were eager to spend time with their peers designing units, fine- 
tuning curriculum maps and creating assessments all in alignment with the curriculum 
design program that was outlined in our school-wide book selection. Children were 
welcomed back to more rigorous, robust instructional units and consistency among team 
members. 

Summer is also a busy time for building maintenance and repair. The custodial staff once 
again took tremendous care of a building that continues to age gracefully. Upgrades to 
the outer doors continued. With the help of Chief Howe and the Fire Department staff, 
improvements in our fire alarm system were made. In anticipation of much-needed 
technology repairs and upgrades, the district-wide Technology Committee began meeting 
to evaluate the needs of each of our buildings. Contributions from Gordon's Greenhouse 
combined with the creative talents of parents welcomed students back to school. 

This school year, we've begun a partnership with the Ipswich Historical Society in 
preparation for Ipswich's 375th Celebration. We're thrilled to be able to further solidify 
the connection between classroom instruction and their community. 
In keeping with tradition, Winthrop School's 2008/2009 theme is, aptly, Community. Our 
community's efforts and sense of value determine who we are. Eleanor Roosevelt said: 
"Where, after all, do universal human rights begin? In small places, close to home - so 
close and so small that they cannot be seen on any maps of the world. Yet they are the 
world of the individual person; the neighborhood he lives in; the school or college he 
attends; the factory, farm, or office where he works. Such are the places where every 
man, woman, and child seeks equal justice, equal opportunity, equal dignity without 
discrimination. Unless these rights have meaning there, they have little meaning 
anywhere. Without concerted citizen action to uphold them close to home, we shall look 
in vain for progress in the larger world." 

We seek to share with children their responsibility in contributing to the culture of their 
community. 






DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL SERVICES 

Diana W. Minton, Director 

The Ipswich Public Schools' Department of Special Services has continued to provide 
services to our students with disabilities. The Massachusetts Department of Elementary 
and Secondary Education in their Mid-Cycle Review found Ipswich in full compliance 
with all regulations. This was the result of many hours of work by a very dedicated staff. 



106 



Staff training has continued. Grant funding has assisted in spanning the gap created by 
minimal local funds. The ongoing requirements of federal regulations will continue to 
create the need for the sharing of information. 

Federal law (IDEA 2004) has established targets which need to be incorporated into our 
practices here in Ipswich. There is increased emphasis on research based education and 
progress monitoring of students. These are areas, as educators, we have been and will 
continue to emphasize now and in the future. 

The dedication and creativity of our educators and support staff make Ipswich a very 
unique educational environment. Ipswich is a special place. 






HALL HASKELL HOUSE STANDING COMMITTEE 

Terri Stephens/Stephanie Gaskins 
Co-chairs-Hall Haskell-House Committee 

The Hall-Haskell-House continues its dual function as a Visitor Center and Art Gallery. 
Activity was robust in both arenas. Use of the art gallery continues to be in demand and 
we are delighted by the number of artists that choose to exhibit their work and wares. 

The Visitor Center is managed by Bill Nelson and Louise Ciolek is the Volunteer Co- 
coordinator. Over 40 volunteers donate their time to run the center from late spring to late 
fall. 

A major undertaking this year was having the exterior of the house painted. Special 
thanks to Karl Ruhland of Ruhland Painting for a job well done and to all volunteers who 
make the visitor experience a success. Monies to support this house come from a % of 
the proceeds of art sales. 






IPSWICH BAY CIRCUIT TRAIL COMMITTEE 

The Ipswich Bay Circuit Trail Committee is a volunteer committee opens to citizens of 
Ipswich that was originally organized to oversee the creation and maintenance of the Bay 
Circuit trail through Ipswich. The committee has written a guide book, worked to 
reinstate old trails and created new trails in order to develop a network that provides the 
town with opportunities for recreation. 



107 



This year the Committee dedicated the three bridges constructed on the portion of the 
Bay Circuit Trail that goes along the southern edge of the Country Club through 
Conservation land and Marini's farm to Willowdale State Forest. The first bridge was 
named for Robert Weatherall, who designed and guided the building of the bridges. The 
second was for Ralph Williams, who was instrumental in the planning and construction, 
and the third for Barbara and Dick Ostberg, both long supporters of the Bay Circuit 

The Bay Circuit Guide to Walks in and Around Ipswich continues to sell well and can be 
purchased at local stores and the Town Hall. The Guide includes: digital maps, new 
sketches of the flora through a grant from the Ipswich Arts Council and text revisions as 
needed. 

The Committee has worked with Turner Hill to insure that trails are open and are well 
marked. As land is developed, the committee continues to work with the Open Space 
Committee, Planning Board and Conservation Commission to see that trails are preserved 
and kept open for the enjoyment of residents. 

Guided trail hikes, open to anyone, have continued to be organized, advertised in the 
Chronicle and led by members of the Committee. This informal walking/hiking group 
continues to meet at Town Wharf parking lot on Wednesdays at 9:30 to explore local 
trails. This group endeavors to walk all Ipswich sections of the Bay Circuit Trail at least 
annually, as well as other trails in town such as Strawberry Hill, Willowdale Mill, New 
England BioLabs, Apppleton Farms, Crane's Beach, Town Hill, Hamlin Reservation, 
Julia Bird Reservation, Turner Hill, Willowdale State Forest and Greenwood Farm 
among others. Contact person: Ed Murphy 978-356-7196. 






GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 

Gerry Brown, Chair 

The Government Study Committee reviewed the quorum required for Town Meetings. 
Currently, Ipswich Town Meetings requires a quorum of 200. At the May, 2008 Town 
Meeting, attendees were surveyed about changing the quorum to zero. Towns Clerks, 
whose towns are roughly the same population of Ipswich, were also asked their 
perspective on a zero quorum. Towns whose quorums are zero overwhelmingly 
recommended it. Because the Ipswich surveys from the May, 2008 Town Meeting were 
mixed and attendance in 2008 was not lacking at either meeting, the committee decided 
not to move on a quorum change at this time. 



108 



CABLE TV ADVISORY BOARD 

Robert Ryan, Chairman 

Over the past year, the CAB has guided the town in making the transition from depending 
on our cable service providers for local programming to providing it all on our own. With 
funds provided by Comcast and Verizon, we have purchased new equipment and 
improved the infrastructure of our system. The improvement is already evident in the 
quality of the broadcasts. However, the coming year will see many more improvements 
including setting up our own studio and hiring a full time director to run it. We have also 
established a non-profit corporation to manage the funds and the station. As this report is 
being filed we are actively looking for appropriate space and candidates for the director's 
position. 



******** 



IPSWICH RECYLING COMMITTEE 

Selectmen's Advisory Committee on Recycling 

The Selectmen's Advisory Committee on Recycling (RAC) is charged with the two- 
prong task of decreasing solid waste costs and increasing recycling in Ipswich. The 
committee works to accomplish its mission by making policy recommendations to the 
Board of Selectmen and through educational efforts within the community. The RAC 
works closely with the town's Department of Public Works. 

In 2008, the recycling rate for those with municipal pick up fluctuated between 24 and 
30% per month. Solid waste tonnage per month fluctuated between 272 and 364 tons per 
month. While these statistics are impressive relative to surrounding communities, the 
RAC will continue its efforts to meet the statewide goal of a 70% solid waste reduction 
by 2010. 

The RAC successfully implemented one of its FY08 goals when, in January 2008, the 
Board of Selectmen voted to amend the town's Residential Solid Waste and Recycling 
Policy based on RAC's recommendations. Three recommendations were made: 1) 
Reduce the allowable number of barrels of solid waste per household per week from four 
to three; 2) Require recycling at all public events on a three-year phased approach, and 3) 
Establish, as a goal, mandatory recycling town-wide by 201 1 . In July 2008, these policy 
changes went into effect and were implemented by the Department of Public Works, 
together with the RAC. 

In July 2008, RAC purchased ten recycling containers to be used at public events. These 
clear containers are designed to encourage proper sorting of waste and are available for 
use by event organizers with advance arrangements. These containers were successfully 
used at Olde Ipswich Days and at the Chowderfest. 



109 



RAC worked closely with the Lions Club to make the Chowderfest a waste free event. 
New England Solid Waste Consultants generously donated composting bins and transport 
of all organic waste to Brick Ends Farm, which donated its processing costs. With the 
donation of compostable cups from New England Biolabs, only one bag one bag of solid 
waste was generated at this event. 

In June 2008, RAC arranged a tour of Brick Ends Farm in South Hamilton, a composting 
facility that currently accepts organic waste from supermarkets and barns. The 
presentation included a walking tour of the facility and a demonstration of how organics 
could be collected curbside, transported to the facility and finally processed for compost. 
This is part of an on-going initiative and investigation of the RAC with the goal being 
further reduction in solid waste disposal costs. 

As part of RAC's initiative to encourage recycling in the school community, it has 
worked closely with the schools and facilitated the donation of additional much-needed 
toters by the DPW to the elementary, middle and high schools. In addition, RAC has 
purchased water jugs for school events to discourage use of bottled water. RAC has 
worked to encourage the use of electronic rather than paper newsletters and funded the 
presentation of an educational play about waste reduction for children in grades K-3 at 
both the Doyon and Winthrop Schools. Finally, the Doyon School independently hosted a 
waste-free lunch day. 




110 



In September 2008, the RAC hosted its Annual Recycling Extravaganza and collected 
tons of electronics and alkaline batteries for proper recycling and disposal. This event 
included the favorite "Swap" where people traded unwanted items at no cost. Leftover 
books, magazines, records, toys, clothing, sporting goods, pet ware and other items were 
donated to Got Books and Savers. In addition, RAC collects old cell phones and wireless 
devices for recycling. 

The RAC maintains a website with comprehensive information about how to reduce 
consumption, reuse items for alternative purposes, and recycle that which cannot be 
reused and compost yard and kitchen waste. This is made possible through a grant 
received from New England Biolabs, Inc. The RAC actively monitors and responds to 
queries sent to its website www.ipswichrecvcles.org 



+ ^^ + 4:j(:^:^: 



TRUST FUND COMMISSION 

Robert K. Weatherall, Chair 
Walter Pojasek. Vice Chair 
Jean Emerson 
Alexander Colby 

The fall in the stock market during the year tested the Commission's decision in 2005 to 
invest the funds in its care in a 35/65 percent mix of stocks and bonds. The decline in the 
market in the first months of 2008 left the Commission with much less money on its 
books to pay for scholarships to graduating seniors than it hand on hand in 2007. It was 
able to approve awards totaling only $6,200 compared with the $12,700 in 2007. The fall 
in their market value prevented the making of awards from two requests that came to the 
Town in the past year, the William G. Markos fund and the Richard Swain Norton fund. 

In light of the market conditions the Commission resolved in June to invest all of the 
funds for the time being in fixed income instruments. Later, as the market appeared to 
stabilize, the Commission voted to move back to a thirty-percent equity allocation. There 
was no further loss in value at year-end. The Commission's assets were down 6.6% for 
the year as a whole. There is no question that investing in equity is the only way to 
maintain the buying power of the Town's funds over time. 

We lost a colleague and gained another. Water Pojasek, who joined the Commission in 
2005, stepped down over the summer. Alexander Colby, director of an investment 
management firm, was appointed by the Selectmen to take his place. 



111 






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